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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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rado immediately after the war. My department embraced the States of Missouri and Kansas, the Indian Territory, and New Mexico. Part of this section of countrywestern Kansas particularly-had been frequently disturbed and harassed during two or tains, plundering and burning stage-stations and the like along the Smoky Hill route to Denver and the Arkansas route to New Mexico. However, when I relieved Hancock, the department was comparatively quiet. Though some military operations had been military posts and a few stations on the two overland emigrant routes — the Smoky Hill to Denver, and the Arkansas to New Mexico-this country was an unsettled waste known only to the Indians and a few trappers. There were neither roads nor well-ma would be so much impeded that the troops could overtake them. At the outbreak of hostilities I had in all, east of New Mexico, a force of regulars numbering about 2,600 men-1,200 mounted and 1,400 foot troops. The cavalry was composed of the Se
d Wolf creeks, and on his arrival there with Custer's and Page's commands, named the place Camp Supply. In conjunction with the main column, two others also were to penetrate the Indian Territory. One of these, which was to march east from New Mexico by way of Fort Bascom, was to be composed of six troops of the Third Cavalry and two companies of infantry, the whole under Colonel A. W. Evans. The other, consisting of seven troops of the Fifth Cavalry, and commanded by Brevet Brigadier-Generose, with five troops of cavalry already in the field southeast of Lyon. The Fort Bascom column, after establishing a depot of supplies at Monument Creek, was to work down the main Canadian, and remain out as long as it could feed itself from New Mexico; Carr, having united with Penrose on the North Canadian, was to operate toward the Antelope Hills and head-waters of the Red River; while I, with the main column was to move southward to strike the Indians along the Washita, or still farther so