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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 42.-battle in New-Mexico. Fort Sumner, New-Mexico, Saturday, January 30, 1864. On the fourth day of this month, at half-past 11 o'clock, the bugle sounded, To arms! To arms! which roused every man in camp. Our company was out on a thirty days scout at the time, only having left six men of the company (B, Second cavalry, California volunteers) in camp, but the six were in their saddles in double-quick, and off. The party consisted of one Lieutenant (infantry) and six men of company B, Second cavalry, California volunteers, three men of company D, Fifth United States infantry, twenty-five Apache Indians, and three Mexican citizens. At ten minutes to twelve o'clock we started down the river Pecos, and soon found the cause of alarm. One hundred and twenty Navajo Indians had been within two miles of the fort, and stolen all the Apache horses and mules, and were driving them off as leisurely as though they had paid for them. We rode for twelve miles at a brisk gallop,
Doc. 64.-operations in New-Mexico. camp Florilla, near Fort Canby, N. M., January 26, 1864. The cumminating point in this expedition has been reached at last by the very successful operations of our troops at Cañon de Chelly. Colonel Kit Carson left Fort Canby on the sixth instant, with a command of four hundred men, t having been pierced with six bullets. As the Navajo expedition is now entirely successful, it is but justice to the officers and men of the First cavalry of New-Mexico, and to Colonel Christopher Carson and his staff, to say that they have all acted with zeal and devotion for the accomplishment of that great desideratum — the all to great energy and inspired great resolution; but it may not be out of place to remark that it is now demonstrated beyond a doubt that, while the troops of New-Mexico have long borne the reputation of being the best cavalry, they have proved themselves on the present campaign to be the best infantry in the world. General J