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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3. You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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thorized, and expressed such confidence of success, that the general-in-chief declared the only instructions Sheridan needed were to advance. This was on Friday, and the supply trains were waiting at Harper's Ferry for forage. Grant asked if the teams could be brought up in time for an attack on the following Tuesday; and Sheridan replied that he could be ready before daylight on Monday. Grant gave him the orders, and felt so confident of the result, that he left the front, and went to New Jersey, to put his children at school. You may recollect that, when I visited Sheridan at Charlestown, I had a plan of battle with me to give him. But I found him so thoroughly ready to move, so confident of success when he did move, and his plan so thoroughly matured, that I did not let him know this, and gave him no order whatever except the authority to move. . . . I was so pleased that I left, and got as far as possible from the field before the attack, lest the papers might attribute to me
He was accordingly ordered to report to Dix, and the force in New York was temporarily increased by five thousand men. The election took place on the 8th of November, and resulted in the success of Lincoln, who received a majority of more than four hundred thousand votes. No election of course was held in the ten Southern states in the possession of the enemy, and the vote of Tennessee was not counted, although given for Lincoln; but of the remaining twenty-five states, all but three,—New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky,—cast their votes for the Union. Fourteen states had authorized their soldiers in the field to vote. Those of New York sent their ballots home sealed, to be cast by their friends; the votes of the soldiers from Minnesota and of most of those from Vermont were not received by the canvassers in time to be counted; but the soldiers from the eleven remaining states gave a majority for Lincoln, of eighty-five thousand four hundred and sixty-one; Beyond all questio