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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
o be, respectfully, your obedient servant, Theodorus Bailey, Rear-Admiral U. S. Navy. To Admiral D. G. Farragut, U. S. Navy. Admiral Farragut's reply. New York, April 3, 1869. My dear admiral — I have received your letter of the 1st, and am really at a loss to understand how you, or even historians can take the views honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, Theodorus Bailey, Rear-Admiral. Admiral D. G. Farragut, U. S. Navy. Correction by Admiral Farragut. New York, May 19, 1869. My dear admiral — I have received your two letters, the first one of which was not given to me until to-day, as my physician has advised a totaery truly, your friend and obedient servant, D. G. Farragut, Admiral U. S. N. Rear-Admiral T. Bailey, Washington. Letters to the Secretary of the Navy. New York, May 24, 1869. Sir — My attention having been called by Rear-Admiral Bailey to an incorrect sketch which accompanied my report of May 6, 1862, upon the passag<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
heir efficiency against the earthworks of Charleston. Admiral Dupont was pressed by the Navy Department to attack the batteries, and on the 7th of April, 1863, he determined to attempt what he was far from certain would be a success, in order to carry out the wishes of the government, and meet, if possible, the public expectations. To understand the harbor of Charleston, with its intricate shoals and channels, requires the study of a chart. In some respects it resembles the harbor of New York, although it is on a much smaller scale. The city of Charleston stands on a neck of land, bounded by two rivers, and projecting into a narrow bay. The bay was protected by Fort Pinkney, Fort Ripley, Fort Moultrie, Fort Beauregard. Fort Sumter, Battery Bee, Battery Gregg, Battery Wagner, etc. These defences were so placed that a vessel attempting to pass Sumter would be under a cross-fire from them all. every fort being armed with the heaviest and most destructive ordnance then known. A