hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 88 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 44 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 24 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for New York State (New York, United States) or search for New York State (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
mer of 1844 was devoted by Mr. Ticknor and his family to a journey through the interior of Pennsylvania, at that time beyond the region of railroads and crowded thoroughfares. Taking a carriage, and a light wagon for the luggage, they followed the windings of the beautiful Susquehanna and Juniata, often missing the comforts to be found on more frequented routes, but finding full compensation in the beauty and seclusion of these river valleys. Passing through the southern parts of the State of New York, which were full of interest and variety, they went through the lake country to Niagara. To George Ticknor Curtis, Boston. Duncan's Island, confluence of the Susquehanna and Juniata, June 23, 1844. my dear George,—I suppose by this time you may be glad to hear something of our whereabouts; or if you are not, we should like to hear something of you, which amounts to the same thing, in Irish. On both accounts, therefore, I write. And, first, we are all well, and have thus f
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
that from the moment the proposition was fairly examined and understood, there has been no stir at all about it . . . . . I ought to add, however,—what is strictly true,—that everybody enjoys the splendor and success of the Exhibition just as much as if we were a substantial part of it; every newspaper in the country, I believe, glorifying it, with the arrival of fresh news of it by every steamer. . . . As I am sending a parcel, I put into it a copy of Webster's late speeches in the State of New York. Your people neither comprehend that we had a moral right to make the stipulation in the Constitution of 1788, to deliver up fugitive slaves,—as we always had done before,—nor that we have a right to fulfil that stipulation now; nor that, if we were to separate from the slave States rather than fulfil it, we should be obliged to renew it in the form of a treaty, or enter into an endless war with them, which would be no better than a civil conflict. The object of the law of 1850 is r
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
a suspension of specie payments. (I do not think that in Massachusetts you have any such clause, but I am not sure.) This will be a notable example of the difficulty caused by the absence of any living sovereign body, for the people of the State of New York can only speak when called into life for the purpose. Until they have so spoken, one of two things must be the case,—either the banks must openly and professedly violate the law, or the Legislature must deliberately set aside the Constituts. This, I think, is likely to be diminished for a good while. . . . . Our politics are in a state of great confusion. As the elder Adams President John Adams. said to me, when he was eighty-nine years old, about the politics of the State of New York for seventy years previous, they are the Devil's incomprehensibles. The reason is that the old parties are breaking up, and the new ones are not yet sufficiently formed and organized to be intelligible. The great contest, as you know, is
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix C: (search)
1816.Mineralogical Society of Jena. 1818.Royal Academy of History, Madrid. 1821.American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston. 1821.American Academy of Languages and Belles-Lettres, Boston. 1825.Columbian Institute, Washington, D. C. 1828.American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 1832.Royal Patriotic Society, Havana. 1833.Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. 1845.American Ethnological Society, New York. 1850.Doctor of Laws, Harvard College, Massachusetts. 1850.Doctor of Laws, Brown University, Rhode Island. 1850.Society of Antiquaries, of London. 1850.Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore. 1857.Institute of Science, Letters, and Arts, of Lombardy. 1858.Doctor of Laws, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire. 1858.Historical Society of Tennessee, Nashville. 1864.Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 1866.Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia. 1866.Doctor Literarum Humaniorum, Regents of the University of the State of New York, Albany.