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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 891 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 266 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 146 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 122 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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though our troops fought most gallantly on that wing, they were compelled to give way before overwhelming numbers. Here it was that we lost most of our men in killed and wounded. The Twenty-third Wisconsin, Colonel Guppy commanding, Ninetysixth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Brown commanding, and Sixtieth Indiana, commanded by Captain Gatzler, and Seventeenth Ohio battery, Captain Rice commanding, fought with the greatest desperation, holding the enemy in check for a considerable length of time, buounded. This battle opened by a sudden attack of two thousand five hundred rebel infantry upon the Sixtieth Indiana and Ninety-sixth Ohio in the woods, which soon broke and fell back, when the rebel cavalry charged upon the battery, (Seventeeth Ohio,) and captured two guns, one of which was retaken. The charge of the Twenty-third Wisconsin was to save the balance of the battery, and it saved it; but was itself speedily overwhelmed, and compelled to retreat. General Burbridge gives it this c
w stragglers. About the time of Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania, the rebel General John H. Morgan, with a large guerrilla band, attempted a raid into Indiana and Ohio, intending probably to recross the Ohio into West-Virginia or Pennsylvania, and join Lee's army. His force consisted of six pieces of artillery and some three tho Generals Schofield and Pope were directed to send forward to the Tennessee line every available man in their departments, and the commanding officers in Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, were ordered to make every possible exertion to secure General Rosecrans's lines of communication. General Meade was urged to attack General Lee's at Louisville, and on the nineteenth, in accordance with the orders of the President, assumed general command of the Departments of the Tennessee, Cumberland, and Ohio. In accordance with his recommendation, Major-General G. W. Thomas was placed in the immediate command of the department of the Cumberland, and Major-General Sher
ver having seen either of the others. Geary's division, supported by Whitaker's brigade, of Cruft's division, was ordered to proceed up the valley, cross the creek near Wauhatchie, and march down, sweeping the rebels from it. The other brigade of the Fourth corps was to advance, seize the bridge just below the railroad, and repair it. Osterhaus's division was to march up from Brown's Ferry, under cover of the hills, to the place of crossing; also to furnish supports for the batteries. The Ohio battery was to take a position on Bald Hill, and the New-York battery on the hill directly in the rear. The Second Kentucky cavalry was despatched to observe the movements of the enemy in the direction of Trenton, and the Illinois company to perform orderly and escort duty. This disposition of the forces was ordered to be made as soon after daylight as practicable. The enemy — Lookout Mountain and the valleys At this time the enemy's pickets formed a continuous line along the right ba
night among the citizens can only be compared to the celebrated siege of Cincinnati, and, in fact, the gathering of Major McDowell's corps of paymasters, the hurried packing of ambulances and wagons, and preparations for burning a few maiden millions of greenbacks, and the presence of the doughty Major, were all somewhat suggestive of that eventful period in the history of your usually bustling, business city, when some two or three thousand ragged rebels frightened the entire commonwealth of Ohio nearly out of all propriety. The comparison, however, ceases with the suggestion, since our fears were not altogether groundless. With the exaggerated relations of stragglers and runaways, growing from bad to worse, as passed around among the hosts of anxious and terror-stricken gossips, was joined the sullen boom of artillery, hour after hour, even into the night, ringing in our ears. The consciousness that a desperate foe was in fierce contest with our gallant boys within two miles of
Doc. 35.-siege of Cincinnati. Operations of the Black brigade. To His Excellency, John Brough, Governor of Ohio: I beg leave to present to you, for preservation in the archives of the State, the accompanying enrolment of the Black brigade of Cincinnati, serving in the defence of that city in September, 1862. This brigade was not formed under the authority of the State; but its labors were in the defence of her soil, and it seems but proper that some memory of it should be preseriscovered a special aptitude for camplife, and with grass, brush, and trees made Camp Lupton an agreeable summer residence. New accessions were received to the ranks every day; colored men, singly, in squads and companies, from every part of Southern Ohio, joining them, until the number exceeded seven hundred, independently of the details made for special duties. Upon the section assigned to them, they continued to labor until the twentieth. During this time they worked faithfully, always do
xposure, reached a house, whence he was taken to Tullahoma, where he now lies in a critical situation. The others, after being shot, were immediately thrown into the river; thus the murder of three men, Newell E. Orcutt, Ninth independent battery Ohio volunteer artillery John W. Drought, company H, Twenty-second Wisconsin volunteers, and George W. Jacobs, company D, Twenty-second Wisconsin volunteers, was accomplished by shooting and drowning. The fourth, James W. Foley, Ninth independent battery Ohio volunteer artillery, is now lying in hospital, having escaped by getting his hands free while in the water. For these atrocious and cold-blooded murders, equalling in savage ferocity any ever committed by the most barbarous tribes on the continent, committed by rebel citizens of Tennessee, it is ordered that the property of all other rebel citizens living within a circuit of ten miles of the place where these men were captured, be assessed, each in his due proportion, according to hi
ings which we may not or dare not do, in shrinking from retaliation for outrage, pillage and murder, this government does virtually acknowledge and accept the theory, the whole theory of Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward. General Morgan makes a raid into Ohio; he is taken, is thrust into a State penitentiary as a felon, to await his trial as a robber. Streight and his mounted brigands lay waste and burn and plunder several counties in North-Alabama--they are taken and treated as prisoners of war. Stonhe conceited editor of the Examiner could wish, and the leaders of the expedition would go as far in preventing their men committing overt acts. And even if the worst was true, how illy it becomes the indorsers of Early in Pennsylvania, Morgan in Ohio, Quantrel in Kansas, and Beauregard in his plot to murder President Lincoln and Lieutenant-General Scott, to take special exceptions to this raid! Either one of the confederate leaders named has been guilty of more doubtful acts than were ever co