Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) or search for Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) in all documents.

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ell me fresh milk for my sick baby at any price; for, said he, that milk has butter in it. After it is churned, if you will send for it, I will sell it to you. No further effort was made with him, not even a remonstrance. The supremacy of law over force was fully recognized. The incident is trifling in itself, but it has its value. The route from Jefferson Barracks lay through the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri, and passed by the way of Springfield and Neosho into the Indian Territory. Reaching Talequah, November 28th, and traveling by Fort Gibson and Fort Washita, they entered Texas at Preston on the 15th of December. From Preston the column moved to Belknap, and thence to Fort Mason, its destination, where it arrived January 14, 1856. Four companies were left on the Clear Fork of the Brazos, under Major Hardee. In this march they forded many rivers, and suffered three weeks of the coldest weather ever felt in Texas. While still on the elevated table-lands,
himself to good works. He was, in very truth, a pillar of his Church; and his genial and affectionate temper cast a pleasant light over his happy and hospitable household, and throughout his neighborhood. In 1838 he was made Missionary Bishop of the Southwest, and was consecrated on the 8th of December. Though he had embarrassed himself by a security debt for $30,000, his means were still ample, and he entered with energy upon a field embracing Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, and the Indian Territory. Hardship, danger, and privation, were constant attendants of his missionary work; and not only his salary, but much more, went to build up the infant church. In 1841 he was elected Bishop of Louisiana, and his usefulness was increased by this concentration of effort. A series of providential visitations, not necessary to be recounted here, had crippled Bishop Polk's large estate; but his pecuniary losses neither shook his earnest faith nor abated his hope and zeal in all good wor