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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
stract attention from it, had been for some time past preparing a descent along the Southern Atlantic coast, though he afterward appeared to have altered his original purpose and to be directing his course toward Cape Lookout, on the coast of North Carolina. With the inadequate force under me, my only hope was to endeavor to frustrate any demonstration that might be attempted within the limits of my own extensive command; and yet the War Department, through the new Secretary of War, was at thatn his defeat, but would soon make another effort, with renewed vigor, and on a larger scale. I was therefore very much concerned when, scarcely a week afterward, the War Department compelled me to send Cooke's and Clingman's commands back to North Carolina, and, early in May, two other brigades [S. R. Gist's and W. H. T. Walker's], numbering five thousand men, with two batteries of light artillery, to reenforce General Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson, Mississippi. The fact is that, on the 10th o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate defense of Fort Sumter. (search)
quarters-room, Fort Sumter, December 7, 1864. from a War-time sketch. Du Pont's attack with nine iron-clad vessels was repulsed, continued until September of the same year, when the fort, silenced by Major-General Gillmore's breaching batteries, had no further use for artillerists, and was thenceforth defended mostly by infantry. One or two companies of artillerists would serve their turns of duty, but the new garrison was made up of detachments from infantry regiments of Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, relieving one another every fortnight. The walls of the fort rose, on all its five sides, to a height of forty feet above high-water in the harbor; but they varied in material and thickness. The materials used were the best Carolina gray brick, laid with mortar, a concrete of pounded oyster-shells and cement, and another and harder sort of concrete known as beton, and used only for the embrasures. The scarp wall was five feet in thickness, but as it was backed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
f the State of Tennessee. West Virginia was in our hands, and also that part of old Virginia north of the Rapidan and east of the Blue Ridge. On the sea-coast we had Fort Monroe and Norfolk in Virginia; Plymouth, Washington, and New Berne in North Carolina; Beaufort, Folly and Morris islands, Hilton Head, and Port Royal, in South Carolina, and Fort Pulaski in Georgia; Fernandina, St. Augustine, Key West, and Pensacola in Florida. The remainder of the Southern territory, an empire in extent, waod in substantially the same relations toward each other as three years before, or when the war began; they were both between the Federal and Confederate capitals. It is true footholds had been secured by us on the sea-coast, in Virginia and North Carolina, but beyond that no substantial advantage had been gained by either side. Battles had been fought of as great severity as had ever been known in war, over ground from the James River and the Chickahominy, near Richmond, to Gettysburg and Cha
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
ontested fight. General Grant will not be troubled with any further reinforcements to Lee from Beauregard's force. Benj. F. Butler, Major-General. On the evening of the 13th and morning of the 14th he carried a portion of the enemy's first line of defenses at Drewry's Bluff, or Fort Darling, with small loss. The time thus consumed from the 6th lost to us the benefit of the surprise and capture of Richmond and Petersburg, enabling, as it did, Beauregard to collect his loose forces in North and South Carolina, and bring them to the defense of those places. On the 16th, the enemy attacked General Butler in his position in front of Drewry's Bluff. He was forced back, or drew back, into his intrenchments between the forks of the James and Appomattox rivers, the enemy intrenching strongly in his front, thus covering his railroads, the city, and all that was valuable to him. His army, there-fore, though in a position of great security, was as completely shut off from further opera
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
Thomas: 14th Ga.,----; 35th Ga.,----; 45th Ga.,----; 49th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. T. Jordan. artillery, Col. R. Lindsay Walker. Poague's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. William T, Poague Richards's (Miss.) Battery; Utterback's (Va.) Battery; Williams's (N. C.) Battery; Wyatt's (Va.) Battery. McIntosh's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. D. G. McIntosh: Clutter's (Va.) Battery; Donald's (Va.) Battery; Hurt's (Ala.) Battery; Price's (Va.) Battery. Pegram's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. W. J. Pegram: Brander's (Va.) Battry; Wright's (Va.) Battery. Unassigned: Sturdivant's (Va.) Battery. Lee's effective force at the commencement of the campaign was not less than 61,000, and Beauregard's command about Richmond and Petersburg, including the troops sent from North Carolina and South Carolina up to May 15th, approximated 30,000. The losses of these armies are only partially reported. In the Wilderness Ewell's corps lost 1250 killed and wounded; McGowan's brigade (Wilcox's division), 481 killed, wounded, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
only reenforcements received by General Lee were as follows: Near Hanover Junction he was joined by a small force under General Breckinridge, . . . 2200 strong, and Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps, which had been on detached duty in North Carolina. Hoke's brigade of Early's division, 1200 strong, which had been on detached duty at the Junction, here also rejoined its division; and at Cold Harbor General Lee received the division of General Hoke, also just from North Carolina--the two Junction, here also rejoined its division; and at Cold Harbor General Lee received the division of General Hoke, also just from North Carolina--the two divisions (Pickett's and Hoke's) numbering 11000 men. The aggregate of these reenforcements (14,400 men), added to General Lee's original strength [which Colonel Taylor estimates at 64,000], would give 78,400 as the aggregate of all troops engaged under him from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. Unhorsed troopers retiring from Sheridan's raid.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.27 (search)
G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. On the 23d of April, 1864, at Weldon, N. C., I assumed command of the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia. It included Virginia, south of the James and Appomattox, and all that portion of North Carolina east of the mountains. General Beauregard was succeeded in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (April 19th, 1864) by Major-General Samuel Jones.--editors. The War Department was closely engaged at that timrged to leave Weldon and repair to Petersburg, where all my available forces were being concentrated, with a view to cooperate with General Ransom for the defense of the capital. But, rapid as were the movements of our troops, withdrawn from North Carolina and other points, their celerity failed to satisfy or reassure the War Department, whose trepidation grew hourly more intense, and whose orders, telegrams, and suggestions became as harassing as they were numerous. The incursion of the ene
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
by Grant from Nashville to Washington and sent down the Atlantic coast to prepare for Sherman's coming to Goldsboro‘, North Carolina,--all converging on Richmond. Preparatory to the next move, General Howard was sent from Savannah to secure Pocotamy army northward from Savannah to Goldsboro‘, or of the transfer of Schofield from Nashville to cooperate with me in North Carolina. This march was like the thrust of a sword toward the heart of the human body; each mile of advance swept aside all 1865, but one more move was left to Lee on the chessboard of war: to abandon Richmond; make junction with Johnston in North Carolina; fall on me and destroy me if possible — a fate I did not apprehend; then turn on Grant, sure to be in close pursuit,ent. This substantially ended the war, leaving only the formal proceedings of accepting the surrender of Johnston in North Carolina and of the subordinate armies at the South-west. The Calico House, General Sherman's first headquarters in Atlanta<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
ceived on the morning of the 3d of December. This is the communication referred to in the letter of Governor Harris, above quoted. This note was read, so far as I know, by only four persons besides myself — my chief-of-staff, James D. Porter, Governor Isham G. Harris, Major J. F. Cumming, of Georgia, and John C. Burch. Not having been in the habit of carrying a certificate of military character, I attached no special value to the paper, and it was lost somewhere during the campaign in North Carolina. Governor Porter and Major Cumming agree with me that the following was the substance of the note: December 3d, 1864. my dear General: I do not censure you for the failure at Spring Hill. I am satisfied you are not responsible for it. I witnessed the splendid manner in which you delivered battle at Franklin on the 30th ult. I now have a higher estimate of you as a soldier than I ever had. You can rely upon my friendship. Yours very truly, J. B. Hood, General. To General B. F.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
subsequent pursuit. When Hood reached Tupelo his whole army numbered about 21,000. Forrest took his cavalry to Mississippi, and the infantry brigades of Gibson, Holtzclaw, Ector, Cockrell, and Sears, with some batteries of artillery, went to General Maury, at Mobile. Of the remainder, perhaps five thousand joined General Johnston in North Carolina the next spring. General Hood ( Advance and retreat, p. 510) says that nine thousand left the ranks between Tupelo and North Carolina.--editors.subsequent pursuit. When Hood reached Tupelo his whole army numbered about 21,000. Forrest took his cavalry to Mississippi, and the infantry brigades of Gibson, Holtzclaw, Ector, Cockrell, and Sears, with some batteries of artillery, went to General Maury, at Mobile. Of the remainder, perhaps five thousand joined General Johnston in North Carolina the next spring. General Hood ( Advance and retreat, p. 510) says that nine thousand left the ranks between Tupelo and North Carolina.--editors.
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