hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
d to mountain-valley, from Alleghany to Chesapeake, from the Potomac to the North Carolina border, the tramp of her sons is heard. Maryland, the Carolinas, Georgia, med in this place. In the other company there are two ministers. The last North Carolina Christian Advocate, referring to this subject, says: The Rev. Messrs. Atkinina Presbyterian states that after a recent sermon to the Third Regiment of North Carolina State troops, near Aquia Creek, Virginia, preached by a Methodist minister r-meetings held every night for two or three weeks in the Third Regiment of North Carolina State Troops, seven of the soldiers have applied for membership in the Meth promotion of morality and piety was formed in the Thirty-seventh Regiment, North Carolina troops, at the instance of the chaplain and with the aid of the colonel. Iiced one-fifth of its fighting force in defence of its country. Of the North Carolina soldiers now in Virginia, some thirty were baptized recently by Rev. W. F.
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
lessed be the name of the Lord. In the hours of night, when there is nothing to lighten the full weight of my grief, I feel as if I should be overwhelmed. I had always counted, if God should spare me a few days of peace after this cruel war was ended, that I should have her with me. But year after year my hopes go out, and I must be resigned. The daughter whose death is so touchingly alluded to in the above letter was Miss Annie Carter Lee, who died at Warren, White Sulphur Springs, North Carolina, the 20th of October, 1862. At the close of the war the citizens of the county erected over her grave a handsome monument, which was unveiled with appropriate ceremonies. In response to an invitation to be present, General Lee wrote the following: Rockbridge Baths, July 25, 1866. Ladies: I have read with deep emotion your letter of the 17th instant, inviting myself and family to witness the erection of a monument over the remains of my daughter, at Warren, White Sulphur Springs,
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
God's word among the needy of our Southern land. I find this item in a file of the Religious Herald for 1864: On an application by Rev. Levi Thorne, of North Carolina, approved by Governor Vance, 100,000 Bibles and Testaments, principally for North Carolina troops in the Confederate service, were granted by the American BibNorth Carolina troops in the Confederate service, were granted by the American Bible Society, New York, at its meeting in December. For the South-west 50,000 were granted at the same time. If other societies at the North made any such donations, I am not aware of it, and should be glad to be informed that I may give them due credit. But with all the copies we could import or print, there was a great scarumes presented to us by Kingston Baptist Church. Our regiment is now in four different directions, hence the chaplain cannot be with them all. Before we left North Carolina there were 137 in the regiment penitently inquiring after the Saviour. Rev. W. G. Margrave: Besides laboring here and there in the camps and hospitals, I h
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
t night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. A colporter writes from Seabrooks hospital, Richmond, to Rev. N. B. Cobb, North Carolina: We had a very interesting young man in our hospital, who made a profession of faith after he entered the army. He told me that soon after he enlisted in th I think if the minister who was so severe on colporters and chaplains, could have seen the convalescents gathering, the cripples hobbling in, one dear little North Carolina boy, who lost both legs at Sharpsburg, brought in and placed in the broad window-sill on cushions —could have seen how happy some Christians looked, and how sand in a few days he learned so as to be able to read the Bible. He has since professed conversion. Rev. A. D. Cohen writes from the camp near Goldsboroa, North Carolina, to the Biblical Recorder. I have more opportunity to do good than at any other time of my pastoral life. Every tent is the habitation of a family of from si
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
averaged two sermons a day to congregations of from one to three thousand listeners. I remember that at one and the same time I had the general conduct of four protracted meetings in four brigades (Gordon's Georgia, Hays's Louisiana, Hoke's North Carolina, and Smith's Virginia), and attended a service in each every day; and that on several occasions I baptized two, three and four times (at different points) without changing my clothes. (The plain truth was that I had only one change, and consc stream fourteen veterans who a few months before had fought at Sharpsburg, and were now enlisting under the banner of the Cross. Several times during the revival in Gordon's Georgia Brigade in the autumn of 1863, Rev. T. H. Pritchard, of North Carolina, or Rev. Andrew Broaddus, of Kentucky, who were laboring in this brigade, administered the ordinance of baptism in the Rapidan in full view and easy range of the pickets on the opposite side. Not many of the men were permitted to attend for
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 10: revivals in the Lower Valley and around Fredericksburg. (search)
. I have within a few days received the most cheering accounts from the Army of Northern Virginia. In almost every regiment protracted meetings are in progress, and souls are being born into the kingdom. Last Sabbath, Rev. N. B. Cobb, of North Carolina, baptized five in Ransom's Brigade, Rev. Mr. Betts two, and the chaplain of the Fourteenth North Carolina five. The meetings in this brigade are becoming more and more interesting every day, and Brother Cobb informs me that quite a number had resolutions, which I am happy to state, they have not forgotten in this time of comparative safety. We have been having some delightful refreshings from the Lord. The glorious work is going on throughout the entire brigade. Chaplain J. M. Cline states, in North Carolina Christian Advocate, that his regiment, the Fifty-second North Carolina, has been experiencing the most glorious revival of religion he ever witnessed. Up to the date of his letter, June 5, thirty-four had been converted.
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
aided in ordination of Brother Eatman, of North Carolina, a chaplain in this brigade, and for four connect themselves with a single Church in North Carolina, and upon inquiry he found that that Churc's Alabama, Posey's Mississippi, Ramseur's North Carolina, Doles's Georgia, Scales's North Carolina,North Carolina, Thomas's Georgia, J. M. Jones's Virginia, Battle's Alabama, Kemper's Virginia, Armistead's Virginiarse's Virginia, Garnett's Virginia, Hoke's North Carolina, Benning's Georgia, Kershaw's South Carolina, Lane's North Carolina, Daniel's North Carolina, Davis's Mississippi, Kirkland's North Carolina, North Carolina, Davis's Mississippi, Kirkland's North Carolina, Semmes's Georgia, Barksdale's Mississippi, Jenkins's South Carolina, Law's Alabama, Anderson's GeorgNorth Carolina, Semmes's Georgia, Barksdale's Mississippi, Jenkins's South Carolina, Law's Alabama, Anderson's Georgia, Steuart's Virginia, Stonewall (Virginia), Iverson's North Carolina, Cooke's North Carolina, H. HNorth Carolina, Cooke's North Carolina, H. H. Walker's Virginia and Tennessee, McGowan's South Carolina, and a number of the artillery battalionNorth Carolina, H. H. Walker's Virginia and Tennessee, McGowan's South Carolina, and a number of the artillery battalions and cavalry regiments. This revival work went graciously on, and though the Bristoe campaign, L
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
ionaries and twelve chaplains; Florida, one missionary and two chaplains; Georgia, eight missionaries and eight chaplains; South Carolina, thirteen chaplains; North Carolina, two missionaries and eight chaplains; Virginia, two missionaries and twenty chaplains. Here are nineteen missionaries and seventy-one chaplains from these e Christloving soldiers go home to be as holy firebrands in our Churches! A. B. Woodfin, Chaplain Sixty-first Georgia. An entire congregation in Scales's (North Carolina) Brigade promptly knelt, a short while since, on an invitation for all Christians, and all who desired the special prayers of God's people to kneel. Bath Ctismal scene. Assembled on the bank of a little pond just in the rear of the trenches was a large crowd of bronzed veterans from Virginia, South Carolina and North Carolina. The great heart of the congregation united in singing, People of the living God; some passages of Scripture bearing on the ordinance were read, and prayer o
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
I can hardly begin to relate them. I will, however, give two which interested me much. One was Captain Williams, of North Carolina troops. He was a young man of great modesty, youthful in appearance, tender-looking and generous. Gallantry had wont be with me. He ultimately died full of hope. Another was a young man named Wilson, also from that good old State of North Carolina. His thigh was fractured in the upper third, but his strong constitution long induced hope of his recovery; forre were four regiments and a battalion—Thirty-second, Forty-third, Forty-fifth, Fifty-third, and Second Battalion—all North Carolina. These all had chaplains, only the Thirtysecond and Second Battalion for a time without. The brigade was made up unh Georgia; Alexander M. Thigpen, Sixth Georgia; A. M. Marshall, Twelfth Georgia; J. J. Hyman, Forty-ninth Georgia. North Carolina.—F. M. Kennedy, Twenty-eighth North Carolina; W. R. Gualtney, First North Carolina; W. C. Power, Fourteenth North Car<
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
vision. Colquitt's Brigade. Nineteenth Georgia. A. J. Jarrell; W. H. C. Cone. Twenty-third Georgia. W. A. Dodge. Twenty-seventh Georgia. George S. Emory. Sixth Georgia. A. M. Thigpen. Twenty-eighth Georgia. A. H. McVay. Clingman's (North Carolina) Brigade, Martin's (North Carolina) Brigade, and Hagood's (South Carolina) Brigade, which had been attached to Hoke's Division, were at this period (February, 1865) on detached service, and I have been unable to obtain a list of their chaplaiNorth Carolina) Brigade, and Hagood's (South Carolina) Brigade, which had been attached to Hoke's Division, were at this period (February, 1865) on detached service, and I have been unable to obtain a list of their chaplains. B. R. Johnson's Division. Ransom's Brigade. Twenty-fourth North Carolina. T. B. Neil. Twenty-fifth North Carolina. Thirty-fifth North Carolina. Fifty-sixth North Carolina. Gracie's Brigade. Forty-first Alabama. Sixtieth Alabama. Fortieth Alabama. Wise's Brigade. Thirty-fourth Virginia. W. H. Robert. Twenty-sixth Virginia. W. E. Wiatt. Fifty-ninth Virginia. L. B. Wharton. Forty-sixth Virginia. W. Gaines Miller. Wallace's Brigade. Seventeenth South Carolina. A. A.
1 2