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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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ing once more to guard the flanks of Lee on his way to Gettysburg; the march across the Potomac; the advance to within sight of Washington, and the invasion of Pennsylvania, with the determined fights at Hanovertown, Carlisle, and Gettysburg, where he met and drove before him the crack cavalry of the Federal army; the retreat therskirmishing was the hard work. He had thus to keep a dangerous enemy off General Lee's flanks as the infantry moved through the gaps of the Blue Ridge towards Pennsylvania, or to defend the line of the Rappahannock, when some Federal commander with thousands of horsemen, came down like a wolf on General Lee's little fold. It wasfected. Nor, for a long time, did his incessant exposure of himself bring him so much as a scratch. On all the great battle-fields of Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, as well as in the close and bitter conflicts of his cavalry at Fleetwood, Auburn, Upperville, Middleburg, South Mountain, Monocacy, Williamsport, Shepherdstow
ep beyond Upperville, where in the last wild charge, when the Confederates were nearly broken, Hampton went in with the sabre at the head of his men and saved the command from destruction by his do or die fighting; the advance immediately into Pennsylvania, when the long, hard march, like the verses of Ariosto, was strewed all over with battles; the stubborn attack at Hanovertown, where Hampton stood like a rock upon the hills above the place, and the never-ceasing or receding roar of his artiled, and his sword flashed. That stalwart form had everywhere towered in the van. On the Rappahannock, the Rapidan, the Susquehanna, the Shenandoah, the Po, the North Anna, the James, the Rowanty, and Hatcher's Run ā€” in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania-Hampton had fought with the stubborn courage inherited from his Revolutionary sires. Fighting lastly upon the the soil of his native State, he felt no doubt as Marion and Sumter did, when Rawdon and Tarleton came and were met sabre to sabre.
main body; but the ground was obstinately held, and victory followed. Advancing northward thereafter, Jackson threw two brigades across at Warrenton Springs, under Early, and these resolutely held their ground in face of an overpowering force. Thenceforward Early continued to add to his reputation as a hard fighter-at Bristoe, the second Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, Monocacy, and throughout the Valley campaign. During the invasion of Pennsylvania he led General Lee's advance, which reached the Susquehanna and captured York. In Spotsylvania he commanded Hill's corps, and was in the desperate fighting at the time of the assault upon the famous Horseshoe, and repulsed an attack of Burnside's corps with heavy loss to his opponents. After that hard and bitter struggle the Federal commander gave up all hope of forcing General Lee's lines, and moving by the left flank reached Cold Harbour, where the obstinate struggle recommenced. It
ring than ever. They only seemed to exasperate him, and make him more dangerous to trains, scouting parties, and detached camps than before. The great secret of his success was undoubtedly his unbounded energy and enterprise. General Stuart came finally to repose unlimited confidence in his resources, and relied implicitly upon him. The writer recalls an instance of this in June, 1863. General Stuart was then near Middleburg, watching the United States army-then about to move toward Pennsylvania --but could get no accurate information from his scouts. Silent, puzzled, and doubtful, the General walked up and down, knitting his brows and reflecting, when the lithe figure of Mosby appeared, and Stuart uttered an exclamation of relief and satisfaction. They were speedily in private consultation, and Mosby only came out again to mount his quick gray mare and set out, in a heavy storm, for the Federal camps. On the next day he returned with information which put the entire cavalry
ā€” that while the infantry has been resting in camp, with regular rations and sound sleep, the cavalry have been day and night in the saddle, without rations at all, watching and fighting all along the front. Let justice be done to all; and it is not the noble infantry or artillery of the late army of Northern Virginia who will be guilty of injustice to their brethren of the cavalry, who, under Stuart, Ashby, Hampton, and the Lees, did that long, hard work, leaving Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania strewed with their dead bodies. But a comparison of the relative value of the different arms was not the writer's purpose. His aim was to point out the contrast which exists in the mere mode of living. The foot-soldier is confined to his camp for the greater portion of the time, and sameness rather than variety, common-place rather than incident, marks his days. In the cavalry this does not exist. As there is no rest for the cavalry-man, so there is no dull routine-no every day t
een sounded; action followed. Lee put his columns in motion for Pennsylvania; Stuart advanced with his cavalry to hold the country east of thhe guns followed; the artillery was over! At Hanovertown, in Pennsylvania, two or three days afterwards, the cavalry did not by any means in the rain by the roadside, pushed on at dawn, and were soon in Pennsylvania, where details were immediately sent out to seize horses. Thesert moved at once-and whole columns went to sleep in the saddle. Pennsylvania had so far proved to us a veritable Land of Drowsy-head! This, and ridden on sotus, a wandering Major-General in the heart of Pennsylvania! In the afternoon the cavalry were at Gettysburg. Vi. Genampaign of 1863. Of this great ride with the cavalry through Pennsylvania, the present writer has preserved recollections rather amusing ay-man who writes this, slept in the saddle. So, it is no wonder Pennsylvania appears to him to-day like a land seen in a dream! Gettysburg w
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., How S-- captured a Federal Colonel's hat (search)
te propensity to rove even on paper; the result of life in the cavalry! I forget that another branch of the service now claims my thoughtsthat the blanket wrapped in its Yankee oil-cloth is rarely strapped behind my saddle as in the good old days when, following one illustrious for ever, I knew not whither I was going, where I would stop, or what greenwood tree would shelter me. Look! the red battle-flag is floating in the wind; the column moves; will we sleep in Virginia, Maryland, or Pennsylvania? We knew not, for the cavalry are your true rovers of the greenwood; so I, who once was a cavalry-man, rove still, even on paper. I perceive I am growing dull. To return to S- and his little scout near Warrenton in 1863. I cannot fail to interest then, you see, my dear reader; for there is a certain species of human interest in the adventures of those who deal in bloody noses, and crack'd crowns, And pass them current too, which everybody experiences; and the relation of these
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., How S.-carried off a Federal field-officer. (search)
ely necessary to attain his object. He accordingly crossed the pistol which he held in his right hand in front of his breast, covered the prisoner's heart, and said politely: Colonel, I asked you your name, and the number and State of your regiment. I refused to give it. If you do not, I will kill you. This response admitted of no reply. The officer looked at his captor, saw that he was quite in earnest, and replied: My name is Colonel ā€” , and my regiment is the--Pennsylvania. All right, Colonel; I see we understand each other. Now I wish you would tell me anything you know that will interest me. And laughing in his low fashion, the scout rode on with his prisoner, whose good-humour gradually began to return. To explain this, it may be conjectured that Sā€” had not upon this occasion encountered a very desperate son of Mars, but a philosopher who contemplated the probabilities of an early exchange, and submitted gracefully to his fate. In an hour the