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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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all the cited clauses of the Constitution. One can scarcely anticipate such effrontery as would argue that due process of law meant an act of Congress, that judicial power could thus be conferred upon the President, and private property be confiscated for party success, without violating the Constitution which the actors had sworn to support. The unconstitutionality of the measure was so palpable that when the bill was under consideration Thaddeus Stevens, a member of Congress from Pennsylvania, said: I thought the time had come when the laws of war were to govern our action; when constitutions, if they stood in the way of the laws of war in dealing with the enemy, had no right to intervene. Who pleads the Constitution against our proposed action? Congress of the United States, July, 1861. This subject is further considered in subsequent chapters on the measures of emancipation adopted by the United States government. It is to be remembered in this connection that pillag
y night telegraphed to Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and other cities, as follows: Orders from Washington render it necessary to send to that city all the available militia force. What can you do? E. D. Morgan. Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania issued the following order: ´╝łGeneral order, no. 23.) headquarters of Pennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordered that the sevePennsylvania militia, Harrisburg, May 26, 1862. On pressing requisition of the President of the United States in the present emergency, it is ordered that the several major-generals, brigadier-generals, and colonels of regiments throughout the Commonwealth muster without delay all military organizations within their respective divisions or under their control, together with all persons willing to join their commands, and proceed forthwith to the city of Washington, or such other points as may be designated by future orders. By order: A. G. Curtin, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. The governor of Massachusetts issued the following proclamation:
with the subject of Federal relations and the adjustment of difficulties until the call for troops by President Lincoln was made, when an ordinance of secession was passed. The contiguity of the northwestern counties of the state of Ohio and Pennsylvania led to the manifestation of much opposition to the withdrawal of the state from the Union, and the determination to reorganize that portion into a separate state. This resulted in the assembling of a so-called convention of delegates at Wheelude of deeds which constitute the crime committed against states and the liberties of the people. When the question of the admission of West Virginia was before the House of Representatives of the United States Congress, Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania declared, with expiatory frankness, that he would not stultify himself by claiming the act to be constitutional. He said, We know that it is not constitutional, but it is necessary. It now became necessary for the government of Virginia, r
the Potomac east of the Blue Ridge, in order, by threatening Washington and Baltimore, to cause the enemy to withdraw from the south bank, where his presence endangered our communications and the safety of those engaged in the removal of our wounded and the captured property from the late battlefield. Having accomplished this result, it was proposed to move the army into western Maryland, establish our communication with Richmond through the Valley of the Shenandoah, and, by threatening Pennsylvania, induce the enemy to withdraw from our territory for the protection of his own. General D. H. Hill's division, being in advance, crossed the Potomac, between September 4th and 7th, at the ford near Leesburg, and encamped in the vicinity of Frederick. It had been supposed that this advance would lead to the evacuation of Martinsburg and Harpers Ferry, thus opening the line of communication through the Shenandoah Valley. This not having occurred, it became necessary to dislodge the gar
ement against Winchester Milroy's force captured the enemy Retires along the Potomac Maryland entered advance into Pennsylvania the enemy driven back toward Gettysburg position of the respective forces battle at Gettysburg the army Retires tattempt to transfer hostilities to the north side of the Potomac, by crossing the river and marching into Maryland and Pennsylvania, simultaneously driving the foe out of the Shenandoah Valley. Thus, it was hoped, General Hooker's army would be callederal army. Longstreet and Hill crossed the Potomac, to be within supporting distance of Ewell, and advanced into Pennsylvania, encamping near Chambersburg on June 27th. The cavalry, under Colonel White, advanced to the Susquehanna. On the nwenty thousand of them had been put hors de combat before the night of the 2d of July. Thus closed the campaign in Pennsylvania. The wisdom of the strategy was justified by the result. The battle of Gettysburg was unfortunate. Though the loss
trary wills of such military rulers as may be placed over us, while our constitutional guarantees will be broken down. Even now the Governors and the courts of some of the great Western States have sunk into insignificance before the despotic powers claimed and exercised by military men who have been sent into their borders. A large number of such arrests were made in Ohio, newspapers were suspended, and editors imprisoned. Like scenes were very numerous in Indiana and Illinois. In Pennsylvania arrests were made, newspapers suspended, editors imprisoned, and offices destroyed. In New Hampshire, Vermont, and Wisconsin many similar scenes occurred. The provost-marshal system was used as a weapon of vindictiveness against influential citizens of opposite political views throughout all the Northern states. No one of such persons knew when he was safe. A complaint of his neighbors, supported by affidavit of disloyal words spoken or disloyal acts approved, received prompt attentio
nment, one of aggression and usurpation, and, on the part of the South, was for the defense of an inherent, unalienable right. My next purpose was to show, by the gallantry and devotion of the Southern people, in their unequal struggle, how thorough was their conviction of the justice of their cause; that, by their humanity to the wounded and captives, they proved themselves the worthy descendants of chivalric sires, and fit to be free; and that, in every case, as when our army invaded Pennsylvania, by their respect for private rights, their morality and observance of the laws of civilized war, they are entitled to the confidence and regard of mankind. The want of space has compelled me to omit a notice of many noble deeds, both of heroic men and women. The roll of honor, merely, would fill more than the pages allotted to this work. To others, who can say cuncta quorum vidi, I must leave the pleasant task of paying the tribute due to their associate patriots. In asserting th
79, 283, 285, 286, 296-97, 302, 303, 366, 367, 370, 371, 372, 373, 375, 378, 433, 434, 435, 436, 439, 542-44, 547, 553. Extract from report on battle of Sharpsburg, Pa., 286. Wounded, 303. Death, 556. Benjamin H., extracts from letter concerning defense of Atlanta, 472-74. General D. H., 76, 77, 79, 103, 104, 105, 111, 114, 115neral J. B., 79, 99, 102, 131, 270, 272, 273, 281-82, 296, 309, 359,360, 361, 372, 466, 468, 473, 475, 478, 480, 481,482, 534, 551. Account of battle of Sharpsburg, Pa., 284-85. Appointment to succeed Gen. J. E. Johnston, 472. Evacuation of Atlanta, 476. Campaign into Tennessee, 482-83, 485-91. Hooker, General, Joseph, 79, 28rning treatment of prisoners, 264-65. Letter from Davis concerning Maryland, 280. Address to Marylanders, 280-81. Remark on death of Stonewall Jackson, 308. Pennsylvania campaign, 366-77. Communication to Gen. Halleck concerning treatment of non-combatants, 499-500. Correspondence with Grant concerning exchange of negro soldi