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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 7 document sections:

the exception of Maine, it lies the farthest eastward of all the States in the Union. Its capital is four hundred and fifty miles east of Washington, and is separated from it by the States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. It contains seven thousand eight hundred square miles of land, river, lakes, and sea. In 1860, it had a population of 1,231,066, engaged in farming, manufacturing, fishing, and mercantile pursuits. Less than one-halfith the expectation of reconstructing it anew, were vain and illusory. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Jan. 29. In Senate.—A message was received from the Governor, transmitting certain resolutions passed by the States of Pennsylvania and Tennessee; also the Ordinance of Secession of the State of Georgia, adopted by a convention of the people of that State, and forwarded to Governor Andrew by George W. Crawford, president of that convention. After some debate, it was vote
n we distinctly heard from the deck of the Cumberland a voice, saying, Shall I fire, sir? At the same moment, we saw six ports opened from United-States ship Pennsylvania. She was lying broadside to us. It was an anxious moment. It seemed as if our friends were intending to do the enemy's work. Another hail from the Cumberland, an answer from us, and the same voice, Shall I fire, sir? A hundred voices yelled Pawnee, and then cheer upon cheer broke from the Cumberland and Pennsylvania, and as heartily answered by us, who felt relieved from peril. The regiment immediately disembarked, and marched to a central position in the yard, and ordered to find uns were being fired by both rioters and military, and the tide of battle was surging, now this way, and now that; then that the mob had turned upon an unarmed Pennsylvania regiment [Colonel Small's, which had left Philadelphia with the Sixth]; that the mob had mounted tops of the cars, and were breaking them in, and throwing down
after the regiment had gone, General Butler ordered them off to serve as a guard on the line of the railroad. The regiment reached the Junction, and took their first substantial sleep on the ground, without shelter or blankets. Our Concord company had nothing but their guns, and what they left home in and their great-coats; and a number had not even the coats—left behind at Annapolis. The baggage, left without charge, got mixed with general United-States stores, and got distributed to Pennsylvania and other troops promiscuously. It is gone past redemption. Thirty men of the Concord company have not yet got a blanket, and sleep on a hard floor. They had not a shirt in the company till last Friday, two weeks from home, except those they wore from home, nor a pair of drawers or stockings till Saturday, and then not enough to go round. There is no complaint. Health generally good, and spirits and patriotism as high and cheerful as yours or mine,—the heroes! The United States have
everybody, and still more sorry that Massachusetts troops should be permitted to suffer. Although a month has now elapsed since they left the State, the muster-rolls of the Eighth Regiment are the only ones which have as yet been received. He then recites the facts concerning the blankets which were put on board of the transport at New York for the Fifth Regiment, which were stowed away so that the regiment could not get them, and were finally taken at Annapolis, and distributed among Pennsylvania troops. He also speaks of the neglect of officers to report to him what they need fully and frequently, in order that he may know what to furnish. In no single instance had authentic information been received of any needs, without measures being taken instantaneously to supply them. We have not less than fifty thousand dollars' worth of under-garments and other clothing now on hand. We are now having manufactured no less than six thousand summer uniforms; and we have spent not less
to confer with the Governor the Wardepartment and appointments Governor makes an address to the people mission to Washington writes to Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania blockade-runners at Halifax Governor saves the life of a private soldier his letter to Patrick Donahoe religious toleration to the editor of theBoston Poss with them. A competent inspector should be appointed here, to see that comdemned shoes are not sold again. Sept. 2.—Governor wrote to Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania,— I have read, with great interest and pleasure, the copy of your communication of the 21st ult. to the President of the United States, which you were kiy exposed the evils resulting from the interference of the War Department with the regular, legal mode of organizing regiments of volunteers. In common with Pennsylvania, Massachusetts has suffered much loss of enthusiasm, and great inconvenience, from those irregularities of which you so justly complain: but I trust we may con
s July 4. Port Hudson capitulated a few days subsequent; and the Army of the Potomac was advancing, by forced marches through Virginia, across the Potomac into Pennsylvania, to head off Lee, who had advanced with his entire command, by a flank movement, into that State. The armies met on the second and third days of July, at Getroops whose term of service had so nearly expired, General Naglee, having telegraphed to General Halleck, proposed that the regiments volunteer for service in Pennsylvania; and the Forty-sixth was ordered to report to General Schenck. The regiments reached Baltimore July 1, and were assigned to the brigade of General Tyler, commnd requisition for transportation to Massachusetts to be mustered out of service. While awaiting transportation, learning the critical condition of affairs in Pennsylvania, the colonel commanding authorized General Naglee to offer the service of the regiment for the emergency; and, being accepted, it was ordered to report to Gene
for many years employed in the office of the Secretary of State, entered warmly into the business of recruiting colored soldiers for Massachusetts, and visited Pennsylvania and other States to advance that interest. In a letter directed to him when in Pennsylvania, the Governor said,— I do not favor recruiting for MassachusPennsylvania, the Governor said,— I do not favor recruiting for Massachusetts in that State, and I do not wish to be understood to favor it. But if, by work in Pennsylvania, you can help those fleeing from slavery through that State to reach Massachusetts, where they will be received into all the rights and advantages of our own citizens, I shall be glad. I do not want either to speculate out of the bPennsylvania, you can help those fleeing from slavery through that State to reach Massachusetts, where they will be received into all the rights and advantages of our own citizens, I shall be glad. I do not want either to speculate out of the blood or courage of colored men; but I rejoice in having been instrumental in giving them a chance to vindicate their manhood, and to strike a telling blow for their own race, and the freedom of all their posterity. Every race has fought for liberty, and its own progress. The colored race will create its own future, by its own br