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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
. The return of our friends Phillips, Chapman, and Collins infuses new life into the general mass. The people are everywhere eager to hear. I am covered all over with applications to lecture in all parts of the free States. The many base attempts that have been made to cripple my influence, and to render me odious in the eyes of the people, have only served to awaken sympathy, excite curiosity, and to open a wide door for usefulness. Notice the large and harmonious meeting of the Eastern Pennsylvania A. S. Society at Philadelphia in December, 1841, at which, however, the temporary suspension of the Freeman in favor of the Standard was voted (Lib. 12: 2, 3, 7, 8). Of the numerous meetings and conventions now instituted, that at Nantucket in August was a conspicuous Aug. 10, 11, 12, 1841; Lib. 11.130, 134. example of the glad renewal of anti-slavery fellowship (the sectarian spirit having been exorcised), and was otherwise memorable. No report is left of the social delights o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ted in the first instance against a peaceable colored First of August procession, and ending with the burning of a Beneficial Hall built for moral purposes by one of the more prosperous of the persecuted —a close parallel to the destruction of Pennsylvania Ante, 2.216. Hall. For instance, the firemen would throw no water on the hall or on a colored meeting-house which was also fired. The day following these scenes (Aug. 3) the Grand Jury presented as a nuisance a new temperance hall for thet decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, the right of trial by jury is denied to such of the people of the free States as shall be claimed as goods and chattels by Southern taskmasters, Case of Prigg against the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Lib. 12: 38, 39, 41, 174, 175; 13: 3, 37). The Court held that, under the Constitution, Congress had exclusive jurisdiction in the matter of fugitive slaves; that State legislation was prohibited unless in aid of the Constitutional provision;
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
nold Buffum, from the West; Thomas Earle, with C. C. Burleigh and J. M. McKim, editors of the Pennsylvania Freeman, and Thomas S. Cavender of Philadelphia; and James S. Gibbons of New York. Mr. Child adhesion to their leader and became non-voters. Persuasion had overtaken the editors of the Pennsylvania Free- Lib. 14: 103, 105. man, and their conduct of the paper according to their new light was formally approved by the Eastern Lib. 14: 135. Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, in Mr. Garrison's presence. Aug. 4, 1844, E. Quincy writes to J. M. McKim, Philadelphia (Ms.): The [Mass.] Board synonymous with dissolution, in fact and in the eyes of the South. So J. M. McKim, in the Pennsylvania Freeman, argued justly that the pretence that the Constitution was anti-slavery was a tacit ain Philadelphia feel a deep interest. Mr. Garrison's activity as a speaker, from Maine to Pennsylvania, was very great in the year under review, until the trouble in his side compelled him to with
rom Mrs. Loring, renewing one of the year before (Ms.). I cannot accept even an implied compliment at the expense of one whose past services and present value to the cause of human freedom I feel to be unequalled. Elsewhere, the Liberator's cry, No Union with Slaveholders! (now printed weekly at the head of the paper) was caught up and re-echoed in the abolition ranks—by the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, in Feb. 5-7, 1845; Lib. 15.33. February; by a vast majority of the Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society at Kennett, in August. In Ohio, the Aug. 11-13; Lib. 15.135, 142. Anti-Slavery Bugle was founded as the disunion organ of the Ohio American Anti-Slavery Society. Lib. 15.109. The levers of disunion ready to the hands of the Massachusetts abolitionists were the recent expulsions of the Ante, pp. 130, 131. State's delegates from South Carolina and Louisiana, and the impending annexation of Texas. At the annual meeting just referred to, Wendell Phillips rep
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ous portrait on wood (Lib. 18: 22), was based on data furnished by him, and is fairly to be called autobiographic. It has been already cited (ante, 1.13-15). It was copied in part in the National A. S. Standard (7.96, 100), and in full in the Pennsylvania Freeman of Mar. 25, 1847. Readers of the first two volumes of the present work will notice some slight discrepancies in Mrs. Howitt's narrative, as was to be expected under the circumstances. At the home of the Howitts, at Clapton, Mr. Garriy Bazaar, opened in the same hall on December 22. Never was more humor combined with a finer discernment of character and more exquisite portraiture than in these lines, written as a Letter from Boston to the editor of the Lib. 17.6, and Ms. Pennsylvania Freeman, by James Russell Lowell: Dear M., Jas. Miller McKim. By way of saving time, The letter is post-marked Dec. 27, 1846. I'll do this letter up in rhyme, Whose slim stream through four pages flows Ere one is packed with tight-screwed
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
laborious lecture engagement with Frederick Douglass begins in midsummer in Pennsylvania, and ends, at Cleveland, Ohio, with Garrison's prostration with fever, at thto H. E. G.; Mar. 23, O. A. Bowe to W. L. G. Central New York, as well as in Pennsylvania, along the two lines of Western travel. The programme, as finally made up, a famous time we have had of it. Every day, two or three 10th annual meeting E. Penn. A. S. S. hundred of our friends from Philadelphia came up in the cars, and thersary for the Liberator. As Sydney H. Gay was present, both the Standard and Pennsylvania Free- Lib. 17.137, 147. man must be referred to for an account of it, prior curiously divided, the scruple being shared by the editors of the Standard, Pennsylvania Freeman, and Bugle, and by many subscribers to the Liberator. Some Liberty Phough they had been spending weeks together, in journeying and lecturing, in Pennsylvania and Ohio. It is only common justice to F. D. to inform you that he says thi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
penalty of the law; but, should they venture to labor even for bread on that day, or be guilty of what is called Sabbath desecration, they are liable either to fine or imprisonment! Cases of this kind have occurred in Massachusetts, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publicatiuary, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847). For the conviction of a Seventh-Day Baptist farmer for working, in Pennsylvania, on Sunday, see Lib. 18: 119. There is, therefore, no liberty of conscience allowed to the people of this country, under the laws thereof, in regard to the observance of a Sabbath day. The last sentence originally read, . . . observance or
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
t prove more subservient than the last. Another cause helped to keep the South fretful and heated: the escape of slaves to the North was reaching alarming proportions, and recovery was blocked by the personal liberty laws whose passage, at the instance of Ante, pp. 59, 92, 216; Lib. 18.23. the abolitionists, has been noticed in the several States. This was particularly felt along the border, in Maryland, Lib. 19.1, 153. Virginia, and in the Ohio Valley. In the Virginia Legislature, Pennsylvania's withdrawal of State aid to kidnappers Lib. 19.1. was declared occasion for war between independent nations, and new guarantees were demanded of Congress Lib. 19.10. and unsuccessfully attempted to be procured. From the same source and from Missouri, appeal was next made to Lib. 19.113. the legislatures of the several States for cooperation in obtaining a new fugitive-slave law, investing any Federal postmaster or collector of customs with the authority of the Federal courts in the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
was made to cow the North Ante, 2.4. through the medium of its trade, and the Union meetings Lib. 20.29, 34, 37, 177, 195, 197, 201, 202; 21.1, 3. with which the year opened and closed were largely sustained by the mercantile community. In Pennsylvania, Ms. Feb. 16, 1850, B. Rush Plumly to W. L. G. the Democrats were ready to sacrifice the slavery issue to that of protection for the iron interest. In New York, John A. Dix, lately United States Senator from that State, wrote on June 17, 18th a power I have yet to hear equalled ( Life and work of J. R. W. Sloane, D. D., p. 84). We quote above from the account of the Rynders mob written by Dr. Furness for a friend of his in Congress, but allowed to be published anonymously in the Pennsylvania Freeman of May 23, 1850 (Lib. 20: 81). We shall also have occasion to use another account from the same hand, printed on pp. 28-35 of the pamphlet commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination (Philadelphia, 1875), and reprinted in
iting an extract from a stupid forgery—a letter threatening him with indictment for intervention or non-intervention sentiments . . . unsuited to the region of Pennsylvania, situated as she is on the borders of several slaveholding States. Lib. 22.3. I avail myself of this opportunity, he said at the Banquet, to declare once moreer—treatment worse than that which the Japanese expedition was ostensibly ordered to Griffis's M. C. Perry, pp. 276-279. redress. He passed into Maryland and Pennsylvania, and was received by the Legislatures and Governors Lib. 22.11, 15. while a bill was pending in each State to prevent the Lib. 22.14, 33. entrance of free ne October, I was hoping to be able to kill two stones with one bird (as some one has said, in Ireland or out of it),—i. e., to make it incidental to my visit to Pennsylvania, to attend the annual meeting of the State A. S. Society; but as that meeting has been postponed from the first week in October to the last, I shall not be ab<
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