hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

operations to support the secession of these counties from Virginia were those in the two great neighboring States of Pennsylvania and Ohio. The conference between the vigorous governor of Pennsylvania and President Lincoln, on April 12, 1861, whicPennsylvania and President Lincoln, on April 12, 1861, which encouraged the President in making his call for troops, was followed by the rapid military organization of the State and the stationing of large bodies of troops at Chambersburg under Patterson, and at other points from which invasion could be madment. For the purposes of this movement, the situation was exceedingly favorable. Ohio was on the western border and Pennsylvania on the northern. Wheeling, the city chosen as the place where the convention would assemble, was in the narrow strip aken, were made necessary by the action of the anti-secessionists in the extreme western counties adjacent to Ohio and Pennsylvania, and also by the evident intention of the Federal authorities to seize and occupy these counties at once. The opponen
eated, harassed by the Confederate cavalry, by way of Abb's valley and Flat Top mountain. In May, General Jenkins' brigade had been ordered into the Shenandoah valley, and in June many West Virginians accompanied him with Ewell's corps into Pennsylvania, fighting at Bunker Hill and Martinsburg in the defeat of Milroy, and leading the advance to Chambersburg, whence they proceeded almost to Harrisburg before the concentration was made at Gettysburg. There they fought gallantly, and on the retl parties sent out from Martinsburg. On the 4th there was a severe skirmish at Petersburg Gap, and on the 15th one at Smithfield. On the night of September 6th, 26 men under Captains Burke and Blackford attacked the camp of two companies of Pennsylvania six months men at Bath, killed Captain Hebble and a number of his men, and brought away 23 prisoners and 50 horses. On the 11th, Captains Imboden, McNeill and Hobson, with about 150 men, attacked 300 Federals under Major Stephens at Moorefiel
ity of Moorefield, Hardy county, in 1815. The family was established in the valley of the South Branch by his grandfather, Daniel McNeill, who immigrated from Pennsylvania about the close of the Indian border war in Virginia. In January, 1837, he married Jemima Harness Cunningham, and a year later removed to the vicinity of Paried in their adventurous duties, capturing in June one of Milroy's trains between Berryville and Winchester, until General Ewell entered the valley, en route to Pennsylvania, when the command reported to Ewell. They participated in the defeat of Milroy, and pursuing his command captured many prisoners and wrought great destruction on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. In Pennsylvania they collected supplies for the army, and assisted in scouting duty. On the retreat the Rangers were with Imboden guarding the trains, and were distinguished for gallantry in battle on the occasion when Imboden's brigade of 1,600 repulsed the assault of a division of Federal ca
arch in the State of Ohio, he exhibited, as he did elsewhere in his march, a policy of such clemency as won us many friends, and tended greatly to mitigate the ferocity which had characterized the war in this section. The conduct of his officers and men has received my unqualified approbation, and deserves the notice and thanks of the government. In March, 1863, Jenkins made another brilliant raid to the Ohio river, and three months later he was on the Susquehanna, before the capital of Pennsylvania. In May he was ordered into the Shenandoah valley, in command of the cavalry, with headquarters at Staunton, and in June was ordered northward to report to General Ewell, with whom he cooper-ated in the defeat of Milroy at Winchester. He fought at Bunker Hill, and at Martinsburg led the advance guard of the army to Chambersburg and made a reconnoissance to Harrisburg. He was wounded on the second day of the Gettysburg battle, but his men, under the command of Colonel Ferguson, won app