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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
xhibited greater energy and efficiency. Passing over muddy roads, exposed to rain nearly every day, they bore the difficulties of the march without a murmer of dissatisfaction. All seemed engaged in a cause which made privation, endurance and any sacrifice, a labor of love. General R. Lindsay Walker says: The conduct of the officers and men of this corps was in the highest degree satisfactory, evincing as they did without exception, throughout the long and trying marches to and from Pennsylvania, the utmost fortitude and patient endurance, under fatigue, and zeal and gallantry in action. General Long in his life of General Lee says, in speaking of the work at Gettysburg: There ensued one of the most tremendous engagements ever witnessed on an open field; the hills shook and quivered beneath the thunder of two hundred and twenty-five guns as if they were about to be torn and rent by some powerful convulsion. In the words of General Hancock, in reference to the performance o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ternoon of July 3d. Lee then fell back to his line of the morning. The order to recross the Potomac was given the night of July 4th, twenty-four hours after the fight was over, and Ewell's corps did not leave Gettysburg till late in the afternoon of the 5th, full forty-eight hours after the close of the battle on the 3d. (See Report of General Lee, Official Records, Vol. XXVII, pages 313-325.) Lee carried back into Virginia seven pieces more of artillery than he carried with him into Pennsylvania. (See Report of Lieutanant-Colonel Briscoe, Chief of Ordnance, Official Record Vol. XXVII, page 357.) At ten minutes past 4 o'clock P. M. on the 4th General Meade says that he would make a reconnoisance the next day (5th) to see where the enemy was, and in that telegram reports his effectives, exclusive of cavalry, baggage guards, ambulance attendants, etc., as 55,000. Now, supposing the cavalry corps which was present at Gettysburg, 12,653, had lost as many as 653, it would leave 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
uch to blame for its long continuance as the people of the South. Why? Because the old slave States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and Pennsylvania, when they found slavery no longer profitable, sold their slaves to other people of the South and pocketed the money. To be sure, a few liberated their slaveshem. The historian Bancroft is authority for the statement that more slaves were emancipated by last will and testament in Virginia than were ever set free in Pennsylvania or Massachusetts. Moreover, emancipation in the North, when it came, was accompanied by no recognition of equality. Prior to 1861 no negro in Massachusetts hages were declared void, and are so still. [This summary was cited and corroborated by the Chief-Justice of Connecticut as late as 1834.] The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania decided in 1837 that a negro or mulatto was not entitled to exercise the right of suffrage. It was not until July 4, 1827, that New York was ranked among the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private Infantryman. (search)
h glory! The second year passed with five hundred and sixty-four battles and engagements, including Shiloh, the seven days battle, which made the dark waters of the Chickahominy run red, Second Manassas and Fredericksburg, and his prowess was proved to the civilized world. The third year passed with six hundred and twenty-seven battles and engagements. It saw his pride at the highest and his hope brightest when, fresh from the victories of Chancellorsville, he invaded the soil of Pennsylvania. Alas! for human hopes! Gettysburg turned backward his footsteps and started anxiety in his breast. How long could these bloody years last? Surely, not longer than seven, as his ancestors' revolution had cost! Then the fourth year passed, with seven hundred and seventy-nine battles and engagements. His anxiety was over. He saw the inevitable end. Hope of success was gone. It was only a question of the days he might be spared before the bullet pierced his heart.