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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
ty by John Miller and Green Clay. Virginia at this time was an empire not only in territory, but her population had reached over 800,000 souls. Her population was over three-fourths of all that of New England. It was nearly double that of Pennsylvania. It was not far from three times that of New York. It was three-fourths of all the population of the Southern States. It exceeded by 60,000 that of North Carolina (including what was afterwards Tennessee), of South Carolina and of Georgia, every foreign war and in conflicts with the Indians, our government has been victorious. The first domestic or internal trouble encountered was under Washington's administration in 1792, and is known in history as The Whiskey Insurrection, in Pennsylvania, which was quelled without bloodshed upon the proper display of authority and determination by the Chief executive. In 1797, when John Adams was President, the famous retaliatory measures known as the Alien and Sedition Acts, were passed, r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
imprisoned Jefferson Davis—was also front Welsh stock; his progenitors, like the Confederate's, having come to America from Wales and sat down among the people of Penn. In the earlier half of the eighteenth century three Welsh brothers, named Davis, sailed from Wales to settle in Pennsylvania. They were young men of the betterPennsylvania. They were young men of the better farming class; not of the gentry, but said to be well-to-do and intent upon taking uplands. Singularly enough, their numerous descendants have no positive record of their advent, or even certainly of their names. Their most famous descendant in the third generation was an aristocrat in instinct, and education; yet he had an utescent. After Mr. Davis' death, a Virginian gentleman of the same name wrote to his widow and urged that his grandfather had settled in Virginia, instead of Pennsylvania or Georgia; basing the claim on the fact of numerous land patents to an Evan Davis (doubtless the Welsh incomer); and to John and Thomas Davis (claimed to be h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
reys, Third Division, Fifth Army Corps, and Pennsylvania Troops, attracted a large number of people e, under command of Major Clay W. Evans, of Pennsylvania, chief marshal, and Captain M. B. Rowe, of s of the Battlefield Memorial Commission of Pennsylvania, in carriages; Governor Edwin S. Stuart, of Pennsylvania, and staff, in carriages; invited guests, veterans in regimental formation. The lines was made by Governor Edwin S. Stuart, of Pennsylvania. Major George F. Baer, president of the comhe heights or to hold them if gained, these Pennsylvania brigades started with hearty cheers to faced of Fredericksburg. The Union veterans of Pennsylvania meet the veterans who bore the Stars and Baong the first was the great war Governor of Pennsylvania. Reconstruction with its blotted record, l I hope at an early day to see Virginia and Pennsylvania unite in placing on Seminary Hill, at Gettynt is the following inscription: Erected by Pennsylvania to commemorate the charge of General Humphr[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Virginia Battlefield Park. (search)
mong the incorporators a.. over two hundred gentlemen, ex-officers and soldiers of the war of 1861-5, from thirty-eight States of the Union and the District of Columbia. In these incorporators are many of the leaders on each side of the war of 18861-5, such as General Horatio C. King, its president, and for twenty-five years the secretary of the Army of the Potomac; General Orland Smith, the present president of the Army of the Potomac; General Daniel E. Sickles; Governor W. A. Stone, of Pennsylvania, and ex-Governor Beaver, of that State; ex-Secretary of the Navy Tracy; General Felix Agnew, of the Baltimore American; General F. D. Grant, Charles Broadway Rouss, ex-Governor Chamberlain, of Maine; Congressman Amos Cummings, ex-Senator Faulkner, of West Virginia; Judge Walter James K. Jones, of Arkansas, General M. C. Butler, of South Carolina; General James Longstreet and Congressman Livingston, of Georgia; Chief Justice Woods, of Mississippi; ex-Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky; Senator
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
convalesced for duty. He was, however, commended by General Lee for gallantry and efficiency in the great cavalry conflict at Brandy. He was again wounded in Pennsylvania and captured and retained in prison for months. Upon his return to his regiment in the Valley of Virginia, though physically feeble, he was welcomed as a towein a house that house began to burn before I was fairly out of it. * * * It always has been so, and always will be so. It has not been always so. On entering Pennsylvania, General Lee proclaimed: It will be remembered that we make war only on armed men. General Scott did the same in Mexico. Mexican ranches found their best marrohibition of slavery after the year 1800. On motion of Mr. Speight, of North Carolina, to strike out this prohibition, all New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, voted aye. Virginia, Maryland, South Carolina voted no; North Carolina divided. By the vote of a solid North, the prohibition was struck out. Afterwards, ne