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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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titude ripened together. Charles, the eldest son of the 1662 proprietary, came to reside in the province which was to be his patrimony. He visited the banks of the Delaware, Albany Records, XVII. 286. Young Baltimore has in contemplation to make a visit on the river. XVII. 297. and struggled to extend the limits of his jurisdiction. Compare Albany Records, XVII. 315, 245; XVIII. 337—35. More on this subject hereafter. Heerman's Journal sheds a clear light on the controversy with Penn. As in Massachusetts, money was coined Chap. XIV.} 1686. at a provincial mint, Bacon, 1661, c. IV.; 1662, c. VIII.; 1686, c. IV. and, at a later day, the value of foreign coins was arbitrarily advanced. A duty was 1686. levied on the tonnage of every vessel that entered the waters. Ibid. 1661, c. VII. It was resolved to purchase a state- 1662. house, which was subsequently built at a cost of forty 1674. thousand pounds of tobacco—about a thousand dollars. The Indian nations were pa
on formed to colonize the tract acquired by Godyn and Blommaert. The first settlement in Delaware, older than any in Pennsylvania, Chap. XV.} 1630. was undertaken by a company, of which Godyn, Van Rensselaer, Blommaert, the historian De Laet, 1630 the island; Hudde, in Albany Records, XVII. 323. Campanius, 79. and houses began to cluster in its neighborhood. Pennsylvania was, at last, occupied by Europeans; that commonwealth, like Delaware, traces its lineage to the Swedes, who had planmitted to Swedish jurisdiction. Compare, on the whole subject, Trumbull's Connecticut, i. 178; Hazard's Register of Pennsylvania, i 17, &c.; Clay's Annals of the Swedes on the Delaware, 22; Hazard, II. 127, 171, 181, 192, 213, 319 &c.; Winthrop, Ind scarce thirty families remained. Albany Records, IV. 217, 222, 223, 237, 273, 311; XVIII. 43, 29, 400. Gordon's Pennsylvania, 23. Compare Albany Records, x. 397—468. During the absence of Stuyvesant from Manhattan, 1655. Sept. the warrio
his method of reform was the advice of William Penn. For in the mean time William Penn had become of Delaware, as an appendage to New York; Pennsylvania was, therefore, in that direction, limited ver and Bay were under the dominion of William Penn. Every arrangement for a voyage to his proviitants and the proprietary, and united with Pennsylvania on the basis of equal rights. The freedom House of Representatives of the Province of Pennsylvania. Printed and sold by B. Franklin. P. 7. anorest, they were surpassed by the reality. Pennsylvania bound the northern and the southern coloniet for the hereditary office of proprietary, Pennsylvania had been a representative democracy. In Mar, he read the account of the government of Pennsylvania; it is perfect, if it can endure. Herder. Such was the birth of popular power in Pennsylvania and Delaware. It remained to dislodge supthat things went on sweetly with Friends in Pennsylvania; that they increased finely in outward thin[17 more...]
of the Hudson only, hut of the rivers that flow to the gulfs of Mexico and St. Lawrence, the bays of Chesapeake and Delaware, opened widest regions to their canoes, and invited them to make their war-paths along the channels where New York and Pennsylvania are now perfecting the avenues of commerce. Becoming possessed of fire-arms by intercourse with the Dutch, they renewed their merciless, hereditary warfare with the Hurons; 1649. and, in the following years, the Eries, on the south 1653 to all; and the docile jury found the main incendiary guilty of sedition. Faction had ebbed; rogues had grown out of fashion; there was nothing left for them but to thrive in the plantations of our America, and learn, said the royalists, How Pennsylvania's air agrees with Quakers, And Carolina's with Associators; Both e'en too good for madmen and for traitors. Truth is, the land with saints is so run o'er, And every age produces such a store, That now there's need of two New Englands more. But
is is right, and corresponds with other data. In the account for N. E. for 1688, I have confidence. Neal blunders about Boston, which, m 1790, had not 20,000, much less in 1720. The statements in the text are made by inductions, and are, I believe, substantially correct. The positive data in those days are half the time notoriously false; as the statements of Randolph. The account in Humphrey much underrates Virginia. New York, not less than twenty thousand; New Jersey, half as many; Pennsylvania and Del-aware, perhaps twelve thousand; Maryland, twentyfive thousand; Virginia, fifty thousand, or more; and the two Carolinas, which then included the soil of Georgia, probably not less than eight thousand souls. The emigration of the fathers of these twelve commonwealths, with the planting of the principles on which they rested, though, like the introduction of Christianity into Rome, but little regarded by contemporary Chap XVIII.} writers, was the most momentous event of the sev