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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

't of Virginia: The undersigned Commissioners, in pursuance of the wishes of the General Assembly, expressed in their resolutions of the 19th day of January last, repaired in due season to the city of Washington. They there found, on the 4th day of February, the day suggested in the overture of Virginia for a Conference with the other States, Commissioners to meet them from the following States, viz: Rhode Island, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. Subsequently, during the continuance of the Conference, at different periods, appeared likewise Commissioners from Tennessee, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Maine, Iowa and Kansas; so that, before the close, twenty-one States were represented by Commissioners appointed either by the Legislatures or Governors of the respective States. The undersigned communicated the resolutions of the General Assembly to this Conference, and
Horrible murder and suicide --Barney Hindley was arrested in William sport, Pa., on the 23d ult., for the murder of his wife, who had been missing since the 11th ult. The Gazette says: During the forenoon of Sunday, Hindley while in his cell, succeeded in getting a razor from another prisoner, and partially cut his throat, nearly severing the windpipe. His situation was almost immediately discovered, and a physician was called and the wound dressed. When he became able to speak, he stated that he had killed and buried his wife that he had killed her on Monday night, put her into a meat barrel in the house, dug a hole on Tuesday and buried her on Tuesday night He offered to tell the physician where he had buried the body of his wife, on condition that he would not disclose it until after his (the prisoner's) death — supposing that his suicide was effected. About the time that these confessions were made to the physician, the body of the deceased was found buried almo
ed amid some distrust and painful apprehension, will close upon a re-united, restored, prosperous, free and happy Republic. The State of New York, the greatest and most powerful of the States, will lead all other States in the way of conciliation: and as the path of wisdom is always the path of peace, so I am sure that now we shall find that the way of conciliation is the way of wisdom." The party also visited Gen. Scott, who spoke as follows: Friends--whet her from New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee or Kentucky--it would make no matter from what quarter you may come, you are my countrymen. [Great cheers, and cries of "You're a noble man;" "Our saviour."] I can find no words to express my sense of the honor you have done me. Fellow-citizens — I receive these cheers with deep thankfulness. One of the great saturnalias of the nation — the inauguration of the Chief Magistrate--is safely passed-- a Chief Magistrate elected by the voice of the people. I pray