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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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onal obligations. He would refer to those States for a proof of this. When the fourth article of the Constitution was adopted, the greater number of the contracting parties held slaves. The hostility of the Northern States to the institution of slavery had led them to disregard their constitutional obligations. The laws of the General Government have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connection, Rhode Island, New York. Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa have enacted laws either nullifying the Constitution or to render useless all attempts to execute the acts of Congress. In many of these States fugitives "held to service and to labor" have been claimed, but in none of them has the State Government complied with the stipulation on this subject made in the Constitution. The ends for which this Government was instituted have been defeated, and the Government itself made destructive by
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.] Crittenden's Compromise Defeated — Lincoln's Manifesto — Embezzlement, &c. Washington, Dec. 23--Crittenden's Compromise was before the Senate Committee of Crittenden last Friday. Bigler, of Pennsylvania was the only Northern man who voted Justice Lincoln's manifesto in Saturday's speech, Senator Crittenden says there is not the best hope for the perpetuation of the Union. It is regarded on all sides as a declaration of war against all seceding States. Suspicion points to an Alabamian as the embezzler of State bonds in the Interior Department.
A "Champion" Reporter. --The Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society, at its recent annual Fair, held at the Wyoming massacre ground, in September last, offered a handsome premium for the best descriptive reports of the proceedings. The Committee of Award met in Philadelphia on Wednesday and awarded the chief prize — a service of silver plate — to John G. A. Townsend, reporter of the Philadelphia Press, whose report, they say, was "marked by a high degree of literary ability and great descriptive power
A veteran American diplomatist. --Jno. R. Clay, who is on his way from Peru, is a veteran diplomatist. He went from Pennsylvania in 1830 with John Randolph, as his Secretary of Legation at St. Petersburg, where he afterward acted in the same capacity with Mr. Buchanan, who has ever since been his friend. In 1838, Mr. Clay was transferred to Vienna, where he was Secretary of Legation until 1845, when he was restored to his position at St. Petersburg by Mr. Buchanan, then Secretary of State. In 1847, Mr. Buchanan obtained from President Polk the appointment of Charge d'affaires to Peru for Mr. Clay, and in 1853 he was made a Minister Plenipotentiary.