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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 9, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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ting them for their bravery and regretting that he was not with them at their first fight. I saw Capt. McKee yesterday. He is very hard on Curtin, (Governor,) and if what he says is true, there is much cause. He says he went into this war as a family affair, to serve his country, but he finds it is only those who eve and teat can get along. Those that have plenty of money can succeed, but the poor man must "clear the track." He says his has the first company offered and accepted in Pennsylvania dog the three months' service. He served that time, came home commenced recruiting for the war, spending every dollar be had, going away from here in Col. Lenman's but regiment with 78 men, according to the Quartermaster account, but when he arrived to Harrisburg was told he had but seven men, and therefore had no command. He says by diainy and treachery he was thrown aside, because he was a poor man, and had no money to buy his commission from Gov. Curtin. Now he a poor man at home
s. General Casey's troops were forced to retire before super numbers, leaving all their camp equipage and two batteries. Colonel Valley, in endeavoring to save his batteries, was killed, Some of the troops in this division from New York and Pennsylvania behaved very badly. Many of the officers were killed and wounded in endeavoring to really their men. General Heintzolman, on ascertaining the result, ordered forward a portion of the divisions of Generals Kearney and Hooker to regain the Why this happened time will show. Brigadier-General Casey regular army officer, and had under his command three brigades. They were originally composed of a brigade under colonel vis, consisting of the 10th Pennsylvania, 11th Maine, Pennsylvania, 51st New York; and Col. Berdan's Sharpshooters; a second under Col. Tidball of the 52nd New York; the 85th Pennsylvania, and the 93d Pennsylvania; and a third, under Col. Aften of the th United States infantry, the 85th New York, and 17th New
p with singular up to 11 o'clock, no damage had Several of the enemy's said to have burst near Gen. Gist, that officer with sand. At night the and rain became on exceedingly but all night long the enemy man regular intervale, the object, being to snatch rest from our The number of hostile vessels yesterday was far greater than after the fearful gale that raged we shall neither be surprised nor to-day that our coast is strewn a shattered wreck. of the Captive Captain. Pennsylvania Captain, (Ciln,) who the captured party, is quite com- but the information contained in is so and of so improbable purpose, that it is scarcely worth re that his company, forming the strength or commander of does not know, left Hilton Head on On Monday they ascended the and were landed at on Mr. where they passed the night. on Tuesday they begin their march Secessionville, and after having ad about a mile and a half, they encounter skirmishers. The engagement was opened with