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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

ely upon them so far as they go; On Sunday, the 14th, the corps of Longstreet was encamped near Hagerstown, between that place and a village called Funkstown. The artillery of Gen. Pendleton, and the battalion to which I am attached, commanded by Col. S. D. Lee, encamped on Saturday, the 13th, near the latter village, and remained there till Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Up to this time the army (I mean the body of it) were evidently under the impression that we would soon go into Pennsylvania. Why we did not go on faster was a matter of frequent inquiry; but such was the confidence in our Generals that no distrust existed, and no sort of anxiety on the subject. The army bad preserved the greatest caution in Maryland in regard to private property — much more so than in Virginia — and this, too, to their great discomfort and inconvenience, and many ned to go on in order to get rid of this embarrassment — When, therefore, the order came, Sabba afternoon, to countermarch towar<
ve of Richard Lyons, King and Queen co. Chas Montgomery, free, D. C. Reed Harrison, free, Prince William co, Va. Thos Jackson, free, New York State. Carter Freeman, slave of John Wood, Fauquier co. Va. Jas Barns, free, Pennsylvania. Chas Boswell, slave of Wm. Davis, Prince William co. Va. Richmond Roane, slave of Dr. Fontleroy, Hanover Dan, slave of Samuel Humphreys, Stafford co, Va. Alex Johnson, free, New York. Mary Cook, slave of Mrs. Randolph Jerry Lomax, slave of Wm. Pratt, Virginia. Horace, slave of Geo Taylor. John Williams, free, Alexandria, Va. Gibson Gracy and three children, slave of widow Goodwin, Fairfax co. Chas Murphy. Andrew Jackson, free, Pennsylvania. Edmond, slave of John Sanderson, Norfolk co., Va. Louisa. Jess, slave of Maj Wm Allen, Jamestown Island. Jim West, slave of Geo R. Cox, King William co. Jackson, slave of Richard Balley, Sandy Point. Nat, slave of
em! These are the movements of the first five days.--Now let us examine the result. On Thursday, the 18th, the rebels sent a flag of truce to ask the privilege of burying their dead, but making a mere show of this religious service, they used the opportunity to abandon their position, and, during the night retreated in mass across the river. The dispatch of General McClellan, which announces this result, closes with the sentence "The enemy is driven back into Virginia. Maryland and Pennsylvania are now safe." He might have added, without any violation of the truth, "and the rebel army is safe also." The next day's telegram to the Associated Press chronicles the same facts in the following paragraph: Headquarters army of the Potomac,Saturday morning, Sept. 20. The rebel army has succeeded in making its escape from Maryland. They commenced to leave about dusk on Thursday evening, and by daylight yesterday morning were all over, except a small rear guard. They saved a