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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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r their losses in the battles of Ligny and Lee Quatre Bras, 68,650 men. Of the rest 12,000 had been put hors de combat by the battles above mentioned, 34,500 were with Grouchy and did not come up, and 8,000 were left on the field of Ligny. The rout of Waterloo was the most completes recorded in modern history. Yet the French lost only 29,000 men--4,000 less than the Yankees affirm that Lee lost in the battle of Gettysburg, while it is certain that Lee did not carry 120,000 with him into Pennsylvania. Like most habitual liars, these Yankees prove too much. If they killed and wounded such a number of men for Lee as they represent, they must have been the most miserable of all cowards to let him get off. But the Yankee army were not cowards. They did not follow Lee because they could not. They had been so badly beaten that pursuit was impossible. The true loss of Gen Lee did not probably reach 12,000 men, while their own as probably doubled that figure.--They were therefore in