Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) or search for Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e Sanitary and Christian Commissions. A large number of valuable donations were sent to Portsmouth Grove Hospital, in Rhode Island, including a Thanksgiving dinner. At the close of the war, in testimony of her valuable services in behalf of the sol2,662; in 1865, 929. It is proper to state that between these dates a large part of Seekonk was set off to the State of Rhode Island, and the fact that Seekonk, Rehoboth, and one or two other towns bordering on the rich and populous city and counin aid of the enterprise; and, on motion of Mr. Burgess, it was voted that, as part of the town may soon be set off to Rhode Island, a committee be appointed to raise money by subscription to arm and support the company, and that a roll be immediatelurplus of ten over and above all demands. It is proper also to state that twenty-five citizens of Swanzey enlisted in Rhode-Island regiments, for whom no credit was given nor allowance made. The whole amount of money appropriated by the town and ra
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
Chapter 12: Norfolk County. This county is bounded north-east by Boston Harbor, north by Suffolk County, west by the south-east corner of Worcester County, south by the north-east corner of the State of Rhode Island, and south and south-east by the counties of Bristol and Plymouth. It has a maritime coast on Boston Harbor of about twelve miles, which is indented by small bays and rivers. Its surface is uneven, and parts of it, especially near Boston, are highly cultivated. The population of the county in 1860 was 109,150; in 1865 it was 116,334; being an increase in five years of 7,184. Since 1865 the city of Roxbury and the town of Dorchester have been annexed to the city of Boston, so that in 1870 the population of Norfolk County was only 89,443. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $86,800,899; in 1865 it was $91,308,287; being an increase in five years of $4,507,388. The net value of the productions of the county for the year 1865 was $36,771,397. According to the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
Chapter 15: Worcester County. This is the most central, and in territory the largest county in the Commonwealth. It crosses from New Hampshire on the north to the States of Rhode Island and Connecticut on the south; on the west it is bounded by the counties of Franklin, Hampshire, and Hampden; and on the east by Middlesex and Franklin. Worcester County contains fifty-seven towns, and one city,—Worcester. The soil is generally good; its surface is undulating and hilly; Wachusett Mountain is its highest elevation. The population of the county in 1860 was 159,650; in 1865 it was 162,923, being an increase in five years of 3,273. The population in 1870 was 192,718, being an increase since 1865 of 29,795. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $75,412,160; in 1865 it was $80,857,766, being an increase in five years of $5,445,606. According to the returns made by the selectmen of the towns and the mayor of Worcester in 1866, the whole number of men which the county furnished