Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) or search for Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
eau of War, colonel, June 23, 1861. Meriwether L. Clark. 609. Born Missouri. Appointed Missouri. 23. Colonel and A. D. C., July 17, 1862. A. D. C. to General Braxton Bragg, Army of the Mississippi. Lloyd J. Beall. 611. Born Rhode Island. Appointed Maryland. 25. Colonel, May 23, 1861. Commanding Confederate States Marine Corps. William C. Heyward. 612. Born New York. Appointed New York. 26. Colonel, commanding Twelfth South Carolina Volunteers and Fort Walker,n B. Lyon.* 1729. Born Kentucky. Appointed Kentucky. 19. Brigadier-General, June 14, 1864. Commanding cavalry brigade, Forrest's Division, Army of Tennessee; then Commanding Department of Kentucky. Lunsford L. Lomax.* 1731. Born Rhode Island. Appointed at Large. 21. Major-General, August 1o, 1864. Commanding division in cavalry corps, Army of Northern Virginia. James P. Major. 1733. Born Missouri. Appointed Missouri. 23. Brigadier-General, July 21, 1863. Commandi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
oduct of New England as Mr. Charles Francis Adams, son of Mr. Lincoln's Minister to England. The Virginians of a still earlier day, with other Southern leaders, notably the Georgians, had striven often and in vain to get the importation of slaves stopped, but Parliament before the Revolution and Congress afterwards listened to the owners of the slave-ships of Old England and New England and continued the slave trade. Many of the fortunes that now startle us with their splendor in Newport, R. I., had their origin in the slave trade, and the social magnates who have inherited these fortunes might take with perfect right as their coat of arms a handcuffed negro, the design which Queen Elizabeth gave to Captain John Hawkins for his escutcheon, when she knighted him as a reward for the benefit that he had conferred on Christendom in originating the slave trade from the coast of Africa to America. John Fiske tells us the story. But the Virginians knew the negro. Although his industr