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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
ecting it. It has allowed itself to be called, by its Southern flatterers, the naturally of slavery. It has spurned the petitions of the people in behalf of freedom under its feet, in Congress and State legislatures. Nominally the advocate of universal suffrage, it has wrested from the colored citizens of Pennsylvania that right of citizenship which they had enjoyed under a Constitution framed by Franklin and Rush. Perhaps the most shameful exhibition of its spirit was made in the late Rhode Island struggle, when the free suffrage convention, solemnly calling heaven and earth to witness its readiness to encounter all the horrors of civil war, in defence of the holy principle of equal and universal suffrage, deliberately excluded colored Rhode Islanders from the privilege of voting. In the Constitutional Conventions of Michigan and Iowa, the same party declared all men equal, and then provided an exception to this rule in the case of the colored inhabitants. Its course on the quest
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
nics like the one we have described might bow and sway them like reeds in the wind; but they stood up like the oaks of their own forests beneath the thunder and the hail of actual calamity. It was certainly lucky for the good people of Essex County that no wicked wag of a Tory undertook to immortalize in rhyme their ridiculous hegira, as Judge Hopkinson did the famous Battle of the Kegs in Philadelphia. Like the more recent Madawaska war in Maine, the great Chepatchet demonstration in Rhode Island, and the Sauk fuss of Wisconsin, it remains to this day unsyllabled, unsung; and the fast-fading memory of age alone preserves the unwritten history of the great Ipswich fright. Lay up the fagots neat and trim; Pile 'em up higher; Set 'em afire! The Pope roasts us, and we'll roast him! Old song. The recent attempt of the Romish Church to reestablish its hierarchy in Great Britain, with the new cardinal, Dr. Wiseman, at its head, seems to have revived an old popular custom, a grim
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The black men in the Revolution and the war of 1812. (search)
d the sloop and was received on board. As it moved out from the wharf, he cried back to his noble friend on shore, God Almighty bless you, Master Baron! In Rhode Island, says Governor Eustis in his able speech against slavery in Missouri, 12th of twelfth month, 1820, the blacks formed an entire regiment, and they discharged thfor his liberty. Struck with the reasonableness and justice of this suggestion, General Sullivan at once gave him his freedom. The late Tristam Burgess, of Rhode Island, in a speech in Congress, first month, 1828, said: At the commencement of the Revolutionary War, Rhode Island had a number of slaves. A regiment of them were Rhode Island had a number of slaves. A regiment of them were enlisted into the Continental service, and no braver men met the enemy in battle; but not one of them was permitted to be a soldier until he had first been made a freeman. The celebrated Charles Pinckney, of South Carolina, in his speech on the Missouri question, and in defence of the slave representation of the South, made th