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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
is intention and invited me to accompany him. I declined to avail myself of the favorable opportunity presented, telling him of my compact with Judge Reagan. He did escape. The conduct of the captors on that occasion was marked by anything but decency and soldierly bearing. They found no armed men-my recollection is that there was not one armed man in our camp. Mr. Davis, Judge Reagan, Colonel William Preston Johnston, Colonel John Taylor Wood, a young gentleman (a Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina,) who escaped, and myself, constituted the President's party. Colonel Harrison, the private secretary of the President, and a few paroled soldiers, were with Mrs. Davis and party, protecting their little baggage, &c. Upon taking the camp, they plundered and robbed everyone of all and every article they could get hold of. They stole the watches, jewelry, money, clothing, &c. I believe I was the only one of the party not robbed. The man and patriot, who a few days before was at the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. (search)
, 0. R. Singleton, Van H. Manning, James R. Chalmers, H. D. Money, H. L. Muldrow, Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi; F. M. Cockrell, D. M. Armstrong, T. T. Crittenden, A. H. Buckner, Benj. J. Franklin, R. P. Bland, R. H. Hatcher, John B. Clarke, Jr., David Rea, J. M. Glover, C. H. Morgan, of Missouri; M. W. Ransom, A. S. Merrimon, A. M. Waddell, A. M. Scales, Joseph J. Davis, Robert B. Vance, J. J. Yeates, Wm. M. Robins, of North Carolina; M. C. Butler, D. Wyatt Aiken, John H. Evans, of South Carolina; J. E. Bailey, Isham G. Harris, John F. House, G. G. Dibrell, Wm. P. Caldwell, W. C. Whitthome, J. D. C. Atkins, Casey Young, J. M Bright, H. Y. Riddle, of Tennessee; Richard Coke, S. B. Maxey, G. Scleisher, D. B. Culberson, R. Q. Mills, J. W. Throckmorton, D. C. Giddings, John H. Reagan, of Texas; R. E. Withers, John W. Johnston, G. C. Walker, Eppa Hunton, John Goode, G. C. Cabell, J. T. Harris, J. R. Tucker, A. L. Pridemore, B. B. Douglas, of Virginia; John E. Kenna, B. F. Martin, Benj
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
n for another attack; all such boats to be painted gray like the blockaderunners, and, when employed, to burn anthracite coal, so as to make no smoke. But unfortunately I had not the means to put the system into execution. Soon after the first torpedo attack, made, as related, by the David upon the New Ironsides, I caused a number of boats and barges to be armed with spar-torpedoes for the purpose of attacking in detail the enemy's gunboats resorting to the sounds and harbors along the South Carolina coast. But, the Federals having become very watchful, surrounded their steamers at night with nettings and floating booms to prevent the torpedo boats from coming near enough to do them any injury. Even in the outer harbor of Charleston, where the blockaders and their consorts were at anchor, the same precaution was observed in calm weather. The anchoring of the large torpedoes in position was attended with considerable danger. While planting them at the mouth of the Cooper and Ash
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
nning the canvass of Memphis. We again commend him as a gallant soldier and an accomplished gentleman every way worthy of confidence and esteem, but he needs no introduction to his comrades of the Western army. Our Trip to Charleston, S. C., and participation in the 22d of February celebration, was a most delightful one, and we made notes of some matters of special historic interest, but want of space compels us to postpone them. We were also fortunate in securing as our agent for South Carolina Colonel Zimmerman Davis, a gallant soldier and excellent gentleman, who is making a most successful canvass for the Society. Our financial prospects, (our friends will be glad to learn) continue to grow brighter, and if our receipts keep up in proportion to those of the past two months, we will have by far the most encouraging report for our next annual meeting which we have ever had. The sketch of the siege of Vicksburg, by Major E. S. Gregory, of the Petersburg Index and Appe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. the Confederate home at Charleston, S. C., is an institution which we have had opportunity of visiting several times recently, and which should command the warm sympathies, fervent prayers, and liberal contributions of philanthropists everywhere. Not long after the close of the war an energetic, devoted South Carolina woman determined to establish a home for the widows and daughters of Confederate soldiers, who gave their lives or were disabled in the cause of Southern Independence. A contribution of $1, made by a poor widow, an inmate of a Home in Baltimore, was the small beginning of this noble charity; benevolent gentlemen and noble women took hold of the enterprise; a building, once the leading hotel of Charleston, and every way suitable for the purpose, was rented (the projector of the scheme mortgaging her private property as pledge for payment of the rent), and has since been purchased; and the enterprise has succeeded beyond the most sanguine e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notice. (search)
in, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of s had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.