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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 23 document sections:

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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Perils and Besetting Snares. (search)
n of himself, of six other doctors of divinity, and of The Journal of Commerce. In the multitude of his bondmen the patriarch found strength, but the bigger the gangs of the plantation, the greater the weakness of the whole establishment. In South Carolina, this species of property has reached a point beyond which accumulation seems to be impossible; yet the State is in the last stages of constructive pauperism, and would not have a doit to cross itself withal, did it not keep watch and ward wih a contest we should be victorious, for victory would be obtained at a cost frightful to estimate — at the expense of a depleted treasury and a diminished population. Those who sneeringly ask us what the North has to do with Slavery, had better devote a few moments of leisure to a contemplation of those contingencies; and should they have any difficulty in coming to a conclusion, we have only to refer them to the condition of South Carolina during the War of the Revolution. January 8, 185
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mitchel's commercial views. (search)
ntil they come out boldly for piracy — that is for what the civilized world has agreed to consider as piracy — they are a set of wooden spoons, talking much, it is true, about chivalry, but without one particle of chivalry in their composition. Such frankness is delightful to us; but the slave-mongers of the South, who have done their best to be bad, and have honorably struggled to be models of inhumanity, may think it a little unkind and altogether undeserved. For our part, although South Carolina has small love for us, we will not stand calmly by and hear her thus slandered, without saying a good word in her defense. We say plainly to John Mitchel, that he does the slave-holder gross injustice. We do not believe that they lack a relish for piracy. On the contrary, we believe that they would engage in it with commendable alacrity, if they thought that it would pay expenses. They probably understand their own business quite as well as Mr. John Mitchel understands it; and if the
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Fillmore takes a view. (search)
ed out, and were we such incorrigible sinners that nothing could bring us to a sense of our perilous state but the traitorous pranks and headlong perjuries of South Carolina? Does Mr. Fillmore believe that the North, intelligent and honest as he knows it to be, will refuse one jot or tittle of what it honestly owes to its unfortuste to redress the injuries which we have heedlessly inflicted. What sharp agony, what recent insult, what shame new and impossible to be suffered has forced South Carolina into an attitude of crime? How many slaves has she lost by the operation of Personal Liberty Laws? Which of her citizens have they impoverished by a penny?,ge of the Charleston oligarchy. No astute compromises though he had carte blanche upon which to write them, would have satisfied the ambitious politicians of South Carolina. He might have gone upon his mild mission with his portfolio full of pretty bills and possible amendments; but he would have returned, if at all, leaving beh
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A banner with a strange Device (search)
A banner with a strange Device Our obligations to the Anarchy of South Carolina are too enormous to be expressed. Bolted she has; quite a large amount of our personal property has she taken with her, but she has left our dear old bird. She has spoiled the gridiron, but she has spared the goose. We have him still, beak, talons and feathers! For us, dis-United States though we may be, he will continue to soar and scream and spread his wings. From our banner a star or two may madly shoot, and a stripe or so may fade; but we keep our bird — creature called by our name — our pet fowl, so admired and respected in the principal Courts of Europe. He has not nullified. Without him we had been bankrupt in our blazonry hard up in our heraldry a colorless, flagless, standardless, buntingless, pennonless people. With him we may indulge in dreams of future glory to some extent gratifying. Let us indulge! The Southern Confederacy it would seem, is sick of ornithological devices. In
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A Southern Diarist. (search)
be wounded; they will be much obliged to the gentleman who may shoot them; wounds will be welcome; gore will be glorious; houselessness sweeter than hospitality. A long and bloody war looms before the rolling eye of the editor of The Yorkville (S. C.) Enquirer as the sun-rise of the millennium. An ounce of lead in his clavicle would, we fancy, materially mitigate his ardor. It was upon Saturday, Jan. 12, while hundreds were engaged in training with pistol and rifle, the afternoon being, as we are told, vocal with the music of preparation, that the diarist made the following entry: If it were conceivable that all our men could be killed, South Carolina need not despair; her women can defend her! The imagination is thus carried back to the Amazonian regiments, to the petticoated squadrons of the King of Dahomey, to Boadicea and Joan of Are. It is rather a drawback to find that the Lady Lancers, the Amazonian Artillery, the Female Fusileers, the Sweet Sappers, the Modern Miners, t
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Montgomery Muddle — a specimen day. (search)
inestimable services for any such petty plunder? Then, too, we are sorry to say that the Congress, on this same specimen day, wasted its precious time in hearing petitions for patents, and in referring them. Now when we consider that discovery and invention are shown by the facts and the figures to be quite out of the Southern line, we cannot but regret to see the energy of the Congress wasted in raising a Patent Committee at all. In 1856--and other years will show a like proportion--South Carolina took out seven letters patent; Georgia, nine; Florida, one; Alabama, eleven; Louisiana, twenty-four; all the Slave States, two hundred and ninety-one against one thousand nine hundred and eighty-two taken out by the Free States. There would seem to be several things making more imperative demands upon the Confederate Congress than a Patent Office. A poor but honest State, struggling with financial difficulties, and striving in good faith to secure a position in the family of nations,
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A private Battery. (search)
ce of a contemporary: A salute was fired this afternoon by Captain James W. Meridith's private battery in honor of the ratification of the Constitution by South Carolina, and the hoisting of the Confederate States flag. Well, in the rapid onset of nineteenth century civilization, beautifully bewritten and philosophized as ditch. We may be assaulted to-morrow, Mr. Younghusband. I wish you would not be forever neglecting our defenses. Does this sort of small talk season the South Carolina cakes and coffee? Obviously — for has not Mr. James W. Meredith put up) erected and established a private battery? Where did he get his guns? Really, we do not know! He cast them, we suppose. South Carolina has every blessing which the Creator has ever bestowed upon any State--why should she not have one more, to wit, a brass mine She expects all the results of human ingenuity to come begging for barter at her door — why should not trampers arrive there now and then with a few sev
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Southern Notions of the North. (search)
been tendered to the Government upon its own terms. We do not believe there are ten thousand persons in Massachusetts who have given nothing or done nothing for the cause. And that which is true of Massachusetts is true of every other free State. Mercenaries, indeed! We do not have to put the screws upon our bank directors here to obtain a public loan, There is a race of giving and a competition of munificence. This in time will, we hope, satisfy our quondam brethren in Virginia, South Carolina and other territories of the United States, that we are not so miserably poor as they have been kind enough to suppose. After all we have given to the sacred cause of Law and Order, we have still a dollar or so left; and can even borrow a little should our present stock fail us. But we have hardly touched the popular pocket yet. So the sooner the subjects of Jefferson Davis stop laying that particularly flattering unction to their souls — that silly notion that we are exceedingly poor —
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Alexander the Bouncer. (search)
dent went to bed to dream in a good, improving, orthodox way of Ananias and Sapphira. Mercenaries of the North!--hirelings of New England, of New York, of Pennsylvania! Goths and Vandals though, according to Gov. Pickens, you be, pray, whatever may happen, try to tell the truth. See what a mean figure V. P. Alexander cuts, standing in a tavern balcony, retailing silly gossip to his gaping dupes! A lie is like a tumbler of soda-water. It foams and frizzes, and is palatable at first, but in a moment is only fit to be thrown out at the window. Thus far the Southern Confederacy has been mainly maintained by public fibs, by private fibs, by the fib telegraphic, the fib editorial, the fib diplomatic, the fib epistolary and the fib oratorical. We think that there must have been many Gascons among the original founders of South Carolina, and if so, how have they improved upon their ancestors!--upon those worthy people who did now and then tell the truth by accident! May 11, 1861.
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Wise Convalescent. (search)
he was in the hands of his medical man taking his pills and potions with a perseverance and a punctuality which seems to have been rewarded; for his Excellency is now clothed at least, if not in his right mind, and is making speeches with all that lunatic force which has always, in the day of his bodily health and strength, characterized his frenzied eloquence. He took the field in his finest fulgurant style at Richmond, Va., on the 1st inst. though it is only lately through The Charleston (S. C.) Courier that he reaches us in red-hot report. He followed Jeferson Davis, and in the matter of fuss and fire, he floored that official completely. In pure, unmitigtatd and sublimely inventive mendacity, we are inclined to think that Mr. Davis can give the Virginian any odds, and then vanquish him; but in the beautiful art of saying nothing and of seeming to say a great deal, Wise is still unsurpassed, nay, unapproached by any mortal. In this speech, he is especially sanguinary; for he sp
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