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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
e besieged, until about an hour after the firing commenced, then two shots were fired from Sumter and glanced harmlessly from the face of Fort Moultrie. Sumter fired no more until between six and seven o'clock when, as if enraged at the onslaught made upon it and kept up with increasing vigor, it then opened from casemate and parapet a hail of shot and shell on Moultrie, steam iron battery, and the floating battery, that fairly made them shake. This was returned with great vigor by the South Carolina gunners. There were good soldiers on both sides, men trained to arms and neither to be daunted by a few shot and shell. The story of that day is known to all who read history, and it is not necessary to further refer to it, excepting in connection with the naval expedition which was fitted out in the earlier part of April to go to the relief of Sumter, the history of which will appear further on in this narrative. Secretary Welles, with a decision worthy of the occasion, did fit out
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
d on the Atlantic coast, one to guard the shores of Virginia and North Carolina under Flag Officer L. M. Golds-borough; the Southern Squadron. extending from South Carolina to the Capes of Florida, was assigned to Flag Officer S. F. Dupont, and the Gulf Squadron to Flag Officer W. W. McKean. Although the capture of the ports aity, and his plans for defence were adopted, making the island of Hilton Head secure against any attack from the enemy. Thus our forces were established in South Carolina, a constant menace to the enemy; the hostile movements from Hilton Head keeping Georgia and South Carolina in constant alarm. Hilton Head Island became in South Carolina in constant alarm. Hilton Head Island became in course of time a place of refuge for hundreds of slaves, fleeing from their masters, who had forced them to throw up intrenchments against their friends, who offered them liberty and protection. Colonel Gilmore's recnnoissance after the battle showed the demoralized condition of the retreating enemy. The road from Fort Walker
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
ter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. Arduous duties performed by Dupont's officers. vario the steamer Planter. great services of Dupont along coasts of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Short references have been made to the by Admiral Dupont's officers on the coast and in the Sounds of South Carolina, the writer not deeming that the limits of this work would permvarious movements of so active an adversary. The soldiers of South Carolina seemed determined that the Northerners should not plant their fght just as well have been taken possession of. The coast of South Carolina is indented with many sounds, bays and inlets, most of them accOgeechee. The reader should have a good map of the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia by him, in order to obtain some idea of the immensesor to do in the way of gaining information along the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The officers under Dupont's command had
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
s had a line of defense (the naval gun-boats) on which they could fall back, regain its formation and send the enemy retreating in his turn. For the present we must leave the sounds and inlets and follow other adventures. All the sounds of North Carolina and the rivers emptying into them as far up as the gun-boats could reach were virtually in the hands of the Federal Government. North Carolina was no longer a base of supplies for the Confederates The sounds and inlets of Georgia, South Carolina and Florida were nearly all closed up by the Navy, and Wilmington and Charleston were really the only two places by which the Confederacy could obtain supplies or munitions of war from abroad. All of this work had been done within a year of the commencement of the war, in spite of delays which enabled the enemy to erect earthworks and sink obstructions that required herculean labors to remove. Inadequate as were the vessels supplied to the Navy, the officers seldom failed to accomp
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
seen that in respect to arms the Confederates had no right to complain of deficiencies. At the battle of Bull Run they were as well supplied with all the appliances of war as were the government troops, who were forced to retreat on that day before the fire of this first army of the insurgents. For some time all these matters had been considered by the southern leaders; and when the time came to act, eleven States rose as one man, and the government had not only to put down the State of South Carolina, with a small number of insurrectionists, but millions of people from Kentucky to Maryland, all armed and equipped and formed into battalions, as if they had been the great reserve of the nation, ready to jump to their arms at the call of the general government. This system of preparation extended to the Navy as well as to the Army. The Confederate leaders knew, two years before the war, what officers of the Navy would unite with them in humiliating the old flag, and though these
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ships had been exposed to the severest General map of Charleston Harbour, South Carolina, showing Confederate defences and obstructions. fire of the enemy more thaptured flags and two small brass field-pieces, lately belonging to the State of South Carolina, which are sent home as suitable trophies of the day. I enclose herewi will also carry with him the first American ensign raised upon the soil of South Carolina since the rebellion broke out. S. F. D. General order no. 2. Flagey must feel at seeing the ensign of the Union flying once more in the State of South Carolina, which has been the chief promoter of the wicked and unprovoked rebellng him the honor to hoist the first American flag on the rebellious soil of South Carolina. My secretary, Mr. Alexander McKinley, was by my side throughout the eng Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance of Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salut
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
y with him the captured flags and two small brass field-pieces, lately belonging to the State of South Carolina, which are sent home as suitable trophies of the day. I enclose herewith a copy of the rer of dispatches will also carry with him the first American ensign raised upon the soil of South Carolina since the rebellion broke out. S. F. D. General order no. 2. Flag-Ship Wabash, Hile satisfaction they must feel at seeing the ensign of the Union flying once more in the State of South Carolina, which has been the chief promoter of the wicked and unprovoked rebellion they have beeervices by allowing him the honor to hoist the first American flag on the rebellious soil of South Carolina. My secretary, Mr. Alexander McKinley, was by my side throughout the engagement, making min the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance of Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from e
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ck thirty-three times in the hull, three times in the smoke-stack, had three boats damaged, and six shot in the rigging. Fortunately, the Pawnee had chain-cables triced up and down her sides, or the boilers would have been perforated. Those South Carolina artillerymen were just as spunky and annoying as were those on the Mississippi, and never lost an opportunity to attack the wooden gun-boats, frequently with effect. There were but four persons wounded in this affair, and it is remarkable the. About 10 o'clock last night the enemy commenced to evacuate the island, and all but seventy-five of them made their escape from Cumming's Point in small boats. Captured dispatches show that Fort Wagner was commanded by Col. Keitt, of South Carolina, and garrisoned by 1,400 effective men, and Battery Gregg by from 100 to 200 men. Fort Wagner is a work of the most formidable kind. The bomb-proof shelter, capable of containing 1,800 men, remains intact after the most terrible bombardme
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
of other forces which were to be used in combination with the Army of the Potomac, which forces were to operate in conjunction with the Navy as near Richmond as it was possible to get. This was the Army of the James, under Major-General Butler, numbering 20,000 men. General Grant directed Butler to operate on the south side of the James River in conjunction with the Army of the Potomac, the objective point of both being Richmond. To Butler's force was to be added ten thousand men from South Carolina under Major-General Q. A Gillmore, while Major-General W. F. Smith was ordered to report to General Butler to command the troops sent into the field from his Department. General Butler was directed, when his forces were able to move, to seize and hold City Point. Grant intended that, in case the Confederates should be forced by his advance into their intrenchments at Richmond, the Army of the Potomac should follow them up, and by means of transports the two armies would become a unit
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
to the value of his work: On the 6th of July, 1863, Rear-Admiral DuPont delivered to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren the command of the forces occupying the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and part of Florida. This force, which consisted of 70 vessels of all classes, was scattered along the coast for a distance of 300 miles; there wasatches of the commander-in-chief as always doing well in whatever situation he was placed. The operations of the Navy were conducted all along the coast of South Carolina and in Florida, after the active and exciting raids in the harbor of Charleston. Several vessels were taken by the enemy: the Columbine, a captured river-boathe most urgent call, could only send forward 135,000 pounds of food. Mississippi was doing all she could in supplying rations to General Beauregard's army. South Carolina could only subsist the troops at Charleston and the prisoners in the interior of the State. The enemy had visited every section of North Carolina, and that S
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