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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
missary of subsistence, died on, the 6th of last May. On the 18th of the following August, D. B. Gillison, private in the Third company of Goodwin's brigade, South Carolina State troops, was borne to our Confederate section in the city cemetery. There, nine days afterwards, we laid our battle-scarred companion, A. M. White, privth the following prominent Confederates: Brigadier-General R. Lindsay Walker, of the Army of Northern Virginia; Brigadier-General M. L. Bonham, ex governor of South Carolina; the Honorable Beverly Tucker, of Virginia, erstwhile in the diplomatic service of the Confederacy; the Honorable Elias Boudinot, a Cherokee chief, lawyer, lirgia; Brigadier-General B. D. Fry, at one time commanding in this city; Brigadier-General R. J. Henderson, of Georgia; Brigadier-General Thomas F. Drayton, of South Carolina; Joseph Eggleston Johnston, the hero of four wars, a most noted leader of Confederate armies, honored at home and abroad, and, general Beauregard excepted, so
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial services in Memphis Tenn., March 31, 1891. (search)
eral J. B. Hood. Drive Sherman back. In February, 1865, General Johnston was ordered by General Lee (then the commander-in-chief of all the armies of the Confederate States) to take command of the Army of Tennessee and all the troops in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, to concentrate all available forces and drive Sherman back. The available forces were five thousand men of the Army of the Tennessee, near Charlotte, N. C., and eleven thousand scattered from Charleston throughout SouthSouth Carolina. Sherman had sixty thousand men. General Johnston urged General Lee, through the Richmond authorities, to withdraw from Richmond and unite with him and beat Sherman before Grant could join him, but Lee replied that it was impossible for him to leave Virginia. Collecting such troops as could be gotten together, Johnston threw himself before Sherman, and on the 19th and 21st of March attacked the head of his column at Bentonville and captured four pieces of artillery and nine hundred p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
ilies, widows, and children, and to adopt such plans or methods as may, in the judgment of said committee, seem to promise success. General Gordon advocated the resolution in a feeling speech. The resolution was unanimously adopted. The following composes the said committee: S. D. Thurston, of Texas; W. H. Simms, of Mississippi; ex-Governor John B. Gordon, of Georgia; H. Newman, of Tennessee; W. B. Nichol, of Alabama (chairman); B. F. Eschleman, of Louisana; Colonel A. C. Haskell, South Carolina; C. M. Busby, of North Carolina; Governor George Fleming, of Florida; Governor Eagle, of Arkansas; General F. M. Cockrell, of Missouri; Governor S. B. Buckner, of Kentucky; General Fitzhugh Lee, of Virginia; and General Bradley T. Johnson, of Maryland. The Association then proceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. Dr. Joseph Jones, of New Orleans, nominated General John B. Gordon for re-election as Commander-in-Chief, which was seconded by Captain William R. Lyman
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 17 (search)
: Miss Annie Stone, representing the Southern Confederacy; Miss Annie L. Stone, representing Missouri; Miss Courtenay Walthall, Virginia; Miss Corinne Hortense Sykes, North Carolina; Miss Annabel Power, Kentucky; Miss Elise Featherstone, Georgia; Miss Elise Govan, Florida; Miss Nellie Fewell, Alabama; Miss Mary Belle Morgan, Louisiana; Miss Caroline Kerr Martin, Texas; Miss Virginia Hunt, Arkansas; Miss Sallie Eleanor Cowan, Tennessee; Miss Marie Lowry, Mississippi; Miss Annie Hemingway, South Carolina; Miss Katie Porter, Maryland. Then came carriages containing the officers of the Ladies' Confederate Monument Association, with Miss Sallie B. Morgan as president; Mrs. Hays, the daughter of Jefferson Davis, accompanied by her husband and son. Next came carriages containing distinguished Confederate veterans, followed by the organized camps Confederate Veterans and the remnants of half a dozen famous Mississippi Confederate regiments. The floats bearing young ladies representing the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Southern Historical Society: its origin and history. (search)
ginia—General Robert E. Lee. Maryland—Hon. S. Teackle Wallace. North Carolina—Lieutenant-General D. H. Hill. South Carolina—Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton. Georgia—Hon. Alexander H. Stephens. Alabama—Admiral Raphael Semmes. TennessT. B. Roy, Captain E. Thornton Taylor. Texas—Colonel A. W. Speight, Major F. Charles Hume, Major D. F. Holland. South Carolina—General M. C. Butler, Major C. H. Suber. Kentucky—Colonel William Preston Johnston. Maryland—H. C. Turnbull, Jr. States. General Isaac R. Trimble, Maryland. Governor Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina. General M. C. Butler, South Carolina. Admiral R. Semmes, Alabama. Colonel W. Call, Florida. General Will. T. Martin, Mississippi. General J. Bpiscopal Church, the President, General Jubal A. Early, introduced with eulogistic remarks, General Wade Hampton, of South Carolina, who delivered an eloquent address, which will be found in the January number, 1874, of the Southern Mag
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 27 (search)
etches, etc. At the last session of Congress a bill was reported in the House of Representatives for the purchase of this historical treasury at a cost of $30,000—this work upon which the patriotic and untiring compiler has been devotedly engaged for more than thirty years, and upon which, it is claimed, and credibly, that he has expended in money more than the sum proposed to be paid to him by the Government. In the United States Senate, September 17, 1891, the Hon. Wade Hampton, of South Carolina, thus urged its purchase: I did not have the opportunity of hearing the remarks of the Senator from New York [Mr. Evarts], but I am somewhat familiar with this compilation, knowing Mr. Townsend and having had some correspondence with him, and I have looked over the prospectus most carefully. I have arrived at the conclusion that it is very important that the Government should possess this work, from the fact that our librarian here, Mr. Spofford, has endorsed it in the very higes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Lee's war-horses, Traveller and Lucy long. (search)
imate in the West Virginia mountains caused Rosecranz's army to abandon its position on Big Sewell and retreat westward. General Lee was thereupon ordered to South Carolina. The Third regiment of the Wise legion was subsequently detached from the army in Western Virginia and ordered to the South Carolina coast, where it was knowSouth Carolina coast, where it was known as the Sixtieth Virginia regiment, under Colonel Starke. Upon seeing my brother on this horse near Pocotalipo, in South Carolina, General Lee at once recognized the horse, and again inquired of him pleasantly about his colt. My brother then offered him the horse as a gift, which the General promptly declined, and at the sameSouth Carolina, General Lee at once recognized the horse, and again inquired of him pleasantly about his colt. My brother then offered him the horse as a gift, which the General promptly declined, and at the same time remarked: If you will willingly sell me the horse, I will gladly use it for a week or so to learn its qualities. Thereupon my brother had the horse sent to General Lee's stable. In about a week the horse was returned to my brother, with a note from General Lee stating that the animal suited him, but that he could not longe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at Fredericksburg, Virginia, unveiled June 10, 1891. (search)
Lee, Jackson and Stuart, conquering, yet unconquering, and gave their life in the defence of their country, were left alone in their bed of glory, covered with flowers of fidelity wet with the tears of love. The monument unveiled. The monument was erected by the Ladies' Memorial Association of this city. The stone used is gray granite and was quarried on the farm of Mrs. Downman, just a short distance from the battle-field. The inscriptions upon the monument are: On the east side—South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina; west side—Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas; north side—Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas; south side—Georgia, Florida, Alabama. The monument occupies a very commanding position in the cemetery, and can be seen from almost every direction as one approaches the city. It stands in the southern portion of the cemetery on a mound about five feet high, where the unknown dead are buried, and is about twenty-five feet in height. The apex of the monument rests