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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ered the United States Senate, had said in the Senate long before, when the nullification of South Carolina was the topic of the day: If I could coin my heart into gold, and it were lawful in the sigharolina, 29 from Tennessee, 28 from Louisiana, 28 from Mississippi, 26 from Alabama, 24 from South Carolina, 17 from Texas, 14 from Georgia, 5 from Virginia, 4 from Florida, 2 from Arkansas, 2 from Ke students at present here is 63; of whom 55 are from North Carolina, 4 from Virginia, 2 from South Carolina, and 1 from Alabama; 9 Seniors, 13 Juniors, 14 Sophomores, and 27 Freshmen. A rigid enfortriculation in the University. Arkansas,1 California,1 Iowa,1 Missouri,1 Texas,4 South Carolina,5 Georgia,7 Virginia,8 Florida,9 Mississippi,11 Tennessee,11 Louisiana,14 Alabama,18 he furnaces, forges, rolling-mills, nail factories, and foundaries. The States of North and South Carolina became, to a large extent, dependent on these mills, and they did also much government work.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
rs had the right, Jackson the centre, and I the left; the whole under command of Brigadier-General R. H. Anderson, of South Carolina. My command consisted of 1oo men from the 1st Florida, 100 men from the 1st Louisiana, and about 150 from the 1st Alnel Thomas M. Jones' Brigade. On 28th of December, 1862, assigned to command of Trapier's Brigade, composed of two South Carolina and two Alabama regiments—same had been commanded for some time by Colonel A. M. Manigault, 10th South Carolina RegimF. Brantley's Mississippi brigade, Brigadier-General Z. C. Deas' Alabama brigade, Brigadier-General A. M. Manigault's South Carolina and Alabama brigades, and Brigadier-General Jacob Sharp's Mississippi brigade. On the reorganization of the Army of Tennessee at Smithville, N. C., on the 8th of April, 1865, was assigned to command of a South Carolina division, composed of Colonel Harrison's brigade, Colonel Rhett's brigade, and Major Rhett's battalion of artillery. My husband returned to th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Company I, 61st Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, C. S. A. (search)
enemy at Mine Run December 2, 1863. Strength of company, 45; present, 32; absent, sick, 2; absent, wounded, 1; absent on detail, 8; captured, 2. Returned to camp on Bell's farm, Orange county, and there remained until January, 1864. January 5th, advanced towards the Wilderness. On 6th May, 1864, we were placed in line of battle, and advanced on the enemy. The Yankee General Wardsworth was killed in front of our line. Lieutenant-General Longstreet was wounded, and General Jenkins, of South Carolina, was killed, both in front of our line by our troops. So much for bad generalship. Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864. Strength of company, 45; present, 36; absent, sick, 2; wounded, 1; detailed, 7; captured, i; on leave, 1; conspicuous for gallantry, 3; wounded, 1. It was in this battle that the gallant and faithful soldier, Elvin K. Casey, lost his arm. On our march towards Spotsylvania Courthouse, Sunday, May 8th, we were assailed near a place called Shady Grove, and after
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First gun at Sumter. (search)
ot fire the first gun at Fort Sumter, but that Captain George S. James, of South Carolina, afterward killed when a lieutenant-colonel at Boonesboro, Md., did fire it. The writer was a captain of a South Carolina army at the time, and an aide-de-camp on the staff of General Beauregard. He now has before him a diary written at summon for the surrender or evacuation was carried by Colonel Chestnut, of South Carolina, and Captain S. D. Lee. They arrived at Sumter at 2:20 P. M., April 11th. icers, accompanied by Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia, and Colonel Chisholm, of South Carolina. The messengers arrived at Sumter at 12:25 A. M., April 12th. Major Andershis knapsack on his back and musket on his shoulder, tended his services to South Carolina to fight against the aggression upon her rights. It was his hand that poinEdmund Ruffin, of Virginia. A piece of the first hemp that is stretched in South Carolina should be kept for the neck of this venerable and bloodthirsty Ruffian.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
as lieutenant of cavalry and served in New Mexico; resigned in 1861; entered the Confederate army as lieutenant of artillery and was successively promoted to the command of a regiment, brigade, division, army corps; in 1862 he was assigned to command the army corps of cavalry of the western army, in which position he continued until the close of the war. By joint resolution of the Confederate Congress he was thanked for successful military operations, and received the thanks of the State of South Carolina for his defense of Aiken. May 11, 1864, he was the senior cavalry commander of the Confederate armies. In 1866 he was offered a professorship in the Louisiania State Seminary, which he declined. He was elected to the forty-seventh, forty-ninth, fiftieth, fifty-first, fifty-second, fifty-third and fifty-fourth congresses. Upon my arrival at Corinth, March 9, 1862, says General Wheeler, I was assigned to the command of a brigade and was sent to the front near Monterey as the adv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wounded at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
harged from the residence of Mrs. Claiborne. W. A. Walker, Company K, 13th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry; discharged. A. Johnson, Company 1, 6th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry; discharged. W. H. Trainy,—— ——, 6th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry; discharged. P. R. Wright, Company K, 13th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry; died May 20, 1862. D. E. Coldfelter, Company E, 5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry; discharged. William Pitts, Company B, Palmetto Regiment, South Carolina; died in the Episcopal Church Hospital, May 15, 1862. S. M. L. Sheeler, Company B, 5th Regiment, South Carolina; died June 18, 1862, at the residence of C. C. P. Waller. Buried in Episcopal churchyard. R. H. Bardine, Company I, 4th South Carolina Regiment; died May 31, 1862, at the residence of A. G. Southall. Buried at the cemetery. A. C. Sheon, Company A, 5th Regiment, South Carolina; discharged from the residence of John De Neufville. W. M. Grier, Company F, 6th Regimen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate armies. (search)
giment of partisan rangers; two regiments of heavy artillery, and twenty-six batteries of light artillery. Mississippi—Forty-nine regiments and six battalions of infantry; seven regiments and four battalions of cavalry; two regiments of partisan rangers, and twenty batteries of light artillery. North Carolina—Sixty-nine regiments and four battalions of infantry; one regiment and five battalions of cavalry; two battalions of heavy artillery, and nine batteries of light artillery. South Carolina—Thirty-three regiments and two battalions of infantry; seven regiments and one battalion of cavalry; one regiment and one battalion of heavy artillery, and twenty-eight batteries of light artillery. Tennessee—Sixty-one regiments and two battalions of infantry; twenty-one regiments and eleven battalions of cavalry; one regiment and one battalion of heavy artillery, and thirty-two batteries of light artillery. Texas—Twenty-two regiments and five battalions of infantry; twenty-eigh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
field officers: Colonel, J. Johnston Pettigrew, of Tyrrell county, then a resident of Charleston, S. C. Colonel Pettigrew had seen service with the forces in South Carolina, and commanded a regiment at the siege and capture of Fort Sumter by the Confederates in April, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel, John O. Long, of Randolph county, a 4th Volunteers, afterwards the 24th Troops, which seems not to be understood. A duplication of this sort in the numbering of certain regiments of Georgia and South Carolina troops did actually exist, and caused much confusion. The regiment was first armed as follows: to the two flank companies were issued rifled muskets of a tloss of the regiment was 147 in all. Soon after Seven Pines the regiment was re-organized, when the following were elected field officers: James Connor, of South Carolina, colonel; Captain Robert H. Gray, of Company L, lieutenant-colonel, and Captain Columbus C. Cole, of Company E, major. They took rank from June 14th, 1862.