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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct.. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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s. per bushel, rie 29; silver at the rate of 29s. per oz. 'Tis now a time of general health. Exiit ut Leo Mensis. Note.—The foregoing, submitted to Mr. J. L. Sibley, Harv. Univ., evolved the following matters of explanation: Rev. D. implies a latinized abbreviation, signifying Rev. Mr.; Rev. D. D.—Rev. Dr. Messrs. Mayhew and Marsh are probably—Joseph Mayhew, Tutor H. U. from 1739 to 1755; Thomas Marsh, Tutor H. U. from 1741 to 1766. Porter—Rev. John Porter grad. 1736, one year after S. C.; and Eliot—Andrew Eliot, perhaps, H. U. 1737, ord. Boston, 1742. Flynt—may be the grad. in 1733. Classes not being very large, and all being required to go to prayers, and meeting together, and being naturally thrown together, much because of the difficulty of getting to Boston, and the small number of families in Cambridge for the students to associate with, there must have been a good deal of familiarity among all undergraduates. Six pounds were raised this year for the necessa
847 Isaac Hill, the well-known politician and governor of New Hampshire, published a sketch of West Cambridge in the Farmer's Monthly Visitor for April 30, 1847, in which he presents many interesting facts regarding the town, on whose border his birth occurred, April 6, 1788. Five celebrated journalists were born within or near the limits of the district now embraced in the town of Arlington: Isaac Hill, of the New Hampshire Patriot; A. S. Willington, or Wellington, of the Charleston (S. C.) Courier; Isaac Munroe, of the Baltimore Patriot; E. S. Thomas, of the Cincinnati Post; and John B. Russell, of the New England Farmer. See Genealogies. A kinsman of his, John Hill, had at this time 20,000 tons of ice for sale at No. 103 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. Mr. Hill was a distinguished ice-cutter, and in 1844, when Boston Harbor was frozen over, he superintended the cutting of a channel through the ice, seven miles in length, down the harbor, to the open unfrozen roadstead, for
alry (three years), Sept., 23, 1861, credited to Charlestown. Died of wounds June 10, 1863. Buried here, age 24—monument. 326 George H. Sprague, age 30, Co. B, Forty-Third Regiment Infantry (nine months), Oct. 11, 1862, credited to Boston. Died March 27, 1863, at Newbern, N. C. Buried here. 327. George Trask, age 18, Co. M, First Regiment of Cavalry (three years), Oct. 1, 1861—residence or place credited to not given-transferred to Co. M, 4th Cavalry. (Died May 3, 1862, Port Royal, S. C.—Family account and monument. ) 328. Rev. Samuel A. Smith, minister First Congregational Parish, missionary to the army, died of a fever contracted at Norfolk, Va., on May 20, 1866, aged 36. Given in Letters from Two Brothers, and not previously mentioned: 329. Alfred Bloxham, age 26, First Battery Light Artillery (three years), July 24, 1862, to Oct. 19, 1864, credited to Cambridge. 330. George H. Cutter, age 19, Co. H, 3d Wisconsin Infantry, enlisted April 24, 1861, for three ye<