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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

f Floyd, Gauley Bridge. October 5--Second defeat of rebels at Hatteras. October 8--Santa Rosa Island. October 11--Repulse at Southwest Pass. October 25--Charge of Fremont's Guard. October 27--Romney, (Kelly wounded.) November 7--Port Royal. December 13--Camp Alleghany, Virginia. December 18--1,300 rebels captured by Pope in Missouri. December 18--Dranesville. 1862. Second rebel repulse at Santa Rosa. Humphrey Marshall's rout. Capture of rebel batteries in S. Carolina. Mill Spring, (Zollicoffer killed) Fort Henry. Roanoke Island. Fort Donelson, (predicted.) Rebel victories, 1861. April 12--Sumter. June 10--Big Bethel. July 21--Bull Run. September 20--Lexington. October 25--Massacre of Ball's Bluff. November 7--Belmont. Wilson's Creek. 1862, None. Recapitulation. Union victories, 23; Rebel victories, 7; ratio, 3 to 1. From Mexico. By the arrival at New York of the steamship Columbia, from Havana, we have
Sparrow. Mississippi--Mr. Brown. Missouri--Mr. Clark and Mr. Peyton. North Carolina--Mr. Davis and Mr. Dortch South Carolina--Mr. Barnwell and Mr. Orr. Tennessee--Mr. Haynes and Mr. Henry. Texas--Mr. Oldham. Virginia--Mr. Hunter and Mr.Johnson Hooper, of Alabama. Mr. Preston, of Virginia, nominated Jno L Eubank, of Virginia. Mr. Barnwell, of South Carolina, nominated James H. Nash, of South Carolina. The first ballot resulted as follows: Dawson, 6; Nash, 4; Hooper, 4South Carolina. The first ballot resulted as follows: Dawson, 6; Nash, 4; Hooper, 4; Eubank, 2; Downs, 2; Montague, 1. No candidate having a majority. Four additional ballots were had without an election. The following was the result of the sixth and last ballot, in detail. For Mr. Nash.--Messrs. Barnwell, Baker, Br Mitchell, Oldham, Peyton, and Sparrow--6. For Mr. Dawson--Messrs. Johnson and Dortch--2. James H. Nash, of South Carolina, having a majority of the votes cast, was declared the Secretary of the Senate, and came forward and was duly qualifi
The resolution of Mr. Foote was adopted with but one or two dissenting voices, and Mr. Bocock was duly declared the Speaker elect of the first Congress under the permanent Government of the Confederate States. On motion of Mr. Boyce, of South Carolina, a committee of two was appointed to conduct him to the chair. The presiding officer appointed Messrs. Boyce, of South Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic adSouth Carolina, and Foote, of Tennessee. After assuming the Chair, the new Speaker delivered the following patriotic address, which was listened to with marked attention, and was received, at its conclusion, with warm applause: Gentlemen of the House of Representatives: I return to you my sincere thanks for the honor you have done me, in selecting me to preside over your deliberations, during this the first Congress under our permanent Constitution. And I desire to say that it will be my one great aim, in discharging the duties of this office, so to conduct myself as to show to you and to the world th
The Episcopal Church of the Confederate States. Bishop Thomas F. Davis, of the Diocesan Convention of the Episcopal Church of South Carolina, now in service at Charleston. has pronounced an address in which he states that price Conventions of the Church in the Confederate States has decided that we were no longer, as a Church, in administrative union with the Church in the United States. He says: This whole subject is simply a question of jurisdiction. It involves no Aru of the Aim, no spiritual condition or office. The creeds ad pre-existed our present condition But jurisdiction in the Church is not strictly The right of jurisdiction is but the appointments and arrangements are not Therefore, although construction and relations must be human only. They must occupy the same ground as other human instructions and be subject to the compensations of Providence and the necessary changes of things, the truth is, the present great of a compensation extraordinary, and a