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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

From Tennessee. an interesting story — the late defeat — Faith in the success of our cause. [correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch] Knoxville, Tenn., Jan. 30, 1862. I yesterday conversed with a young man in the General Hospital at this place, whose story is interesting. His name is W. L. Richardson; he is ails with the volunteers encamped here. They think Floyd would be the man to retrieve the Fishing creek disaster, repulse the advance of the Federalists into East Tennessee, and lead our forces to victory. The young Mississippian, after an unsuccessful effort to desert, succeeded on a second trial. He made his way through South western Virginia into Tennessee, was arrested and taken to Cumberland Gap, then brought to this place. He soon enlisted as a recruit for a company in the harbor of Charleston, S. C. The day before he was to start he was attacked with typhoid fever, from which he is just recovered. When fully able, he will join his company.
appear to command a higher position in British esteem, and are rising in the market. The last quotations were as follows: United States 6's, coupon, 1881, 89 a 89¼; do, 5's, coupon, 1874, 78 a 79¼; Indiana 5's,--a 7, Virginia 6's, 51; Tennessee 6's, 44¼ a 44¼; North Carolina 6's, 62 a 62¼; Missouri 5's, 41a 41¼; Pacific Mail, 98¾ a 99. Tax on gas. One of the first subjects of taxation will, no doubt, be the illuminating gas which now enters so largely into the consumption of ompletion of an unfinished gap of some forty miles, more or less, of an inside line of railroads between Richmond and the South, running down through the western part of North Carolina, and at a pretty safe distance from the army of Buell, in East Tennessee, and of Burnside, in Eastern North Carolina. Jeff. Davis, in his last message to Congress, referred to the importance of finishing the work required to open this inside track. But the chances are now that the Richmond Railroad Conventio