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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 25, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Gen. J. C. Vaughn telegraphs to Knoxville from Richmond, under date of the 16th, that the prisoners from East Tennessee, paroled at Vicksburg and elsewhere, will rendezvous at some point in East Tennessee, instead of Demopolis, Ala. All parties leaving Columbus, Ga., whether ladies or gentlemen, are obliged to pay one dollar for passports. Five thousand Texans have arrived at Morton, Miss., since the fall of Vicksburg, and five thousand more are coming. The Exchange Hotel, East Tennessee, instead of Demopolis, Ala. All parties leaving Columbus, Ga., whether ladies or gentlemen, are obliged to pay one dollar for passports. Five thousand Texans have arrived at Morton, Miss., since the fall of Vicksburg, and five thousand more are coming. The Exchange Hotel, at Danville, Va., has been sold, with 127 acres of land near there, for $38,000. Rev. Thos. Murphy, a Catholic priest, of Wilmington, N. C., died on the 20th inst. Hon. Thos. H. Watts, Governor elect of Alabama, is on a visit to Montgomery, Ala.
lion" the coup de grace by a united blow against Richmond. The fall of Vicksburg is followed by an exhibition of energy at Charleston no less desperate and persevering, to be succeeded probably by an attempt at Savannah and Mobile.--Against the latter but a moiety of Grant's army will be directed in combination with the fleet, while the remainder may form a junction with Rosecrans, with the view, as their avowal and oft-repeated intentions render reasonable, of securing Chattanooga and East Tennessee, and then Atlanta, Ga., the heart of the railroad circulation of the South. This done, and the Confederacy split again, the rebellion is virtually crushed, as they will believe, and the fall of Richmond only a question of time. Meantime, Gen. Meade, too weak to advance himself, and in the event of an advance by Gen. Lee, has placed his army beyond the Rappahannock, in a position he is daily strengthening, or so as to easily fall back to another more defensible. How far these crude sp
The military situation of Chattanooga. --Military men, fully acquainted with the location and surroundings of Chattanooga, have pronounced that point the strongest in the Confederate States. General Floyd, while passing through that city on his retreat from Middle Tennessee in 1862, is reported to have said that 10,000 men could hold the country from Bridgeport to Chattanooga against 80,000. Similar opinions have been expressed by the most experienced engineers in the army. This is at present Gen. Bragg's line of defence. His base is supported by the rich and grain-growing States of Alabama and Georgia; the location is one of the healthiest on the Western continent; his commissariat is said to be ample; he has an army of veteran soldiers and the assistance of the ablest Generals in the Confederacy. His adversary, in order to attack him, must leave his base some 350 miles in his rear; cross, first, a plain of 150 miles, made desolate by the two contending armies in the early s