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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

From Middle Tennessee. --A citizen of Davidson county, Tenn., who left there within the last ten days, reports (to the Huntsville Confederate) 2,500 Yankee infantry at Columbia. He states that the bold partisan, Dick McCann, with fifteen men, was captured in Hickman county, by a Yankee force sent out from Nashville. He had sixteen men, and only one escaped to tell the tale.
Relative to movements in Gen. Meade's department, the Herald says: The intelligence from the army of General Meade is not indicative of any immediate movement. Information comes from deserters that Gen. Lee's army is scattered over a wide extent of country — from the Blue Ridge to the Rappahannock. Between this and the Rapidan rivers only a few pickets are posted. It is pretty well ascertained that no important force of Lee's army has crossed the Rappahannock. The news from Tennessee is not news to the Confederates. Gen. Burnside entered Knoxville on the 4th inst. There is very little intelligence from Rosecrans. A telegram from Bridgeport, dated the 3d, says: All quiet to-day in front. Forty or fifty deserters and refugees come in daily since the army has crossed the river. The divisions remaining on the north side of the river are contracting their lines, and can cross at short notice. The bridge at Bridgeport was repaired by noon to-day, and trains h
A Victory in Tennessee--capture of several hundred prisoners.[special dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.] Lynchburg, Sept. 10. --On Tuesday morning a fight occurred at Telford's, a station on the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, 33 miles from Bristol and 93 from Knoxville. The enemy was driven back six miles to Limestone.--There our forces came up with them, and after a short engagement captured several hundred Yankees and about 100 East Tennessee tories, who had gotten into a babout 100 East Tennessee tories, who had gotten into a block house, from which they were delivering a pretty heavy fire on our troops. Our casualties were slight. The loss of the enemy is not known, as their dead and wounded were carried off to the rear in a train on the railroad. Two hundred and fifty-five of the prisoners arrived here this evening. The rumored capture of Crowley, Montgomery, and Nelson proves unfounded. They all escaped, and have come through into our lines.