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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,030 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 578 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 482 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 198 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 116 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 96 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Texas (Texas, United States) or search for Texas (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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arly caught by the Indians a primitive habitation a brave drummer boy's death a Mexican ball. On the 1st day of July, 1853, I was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the First Regiment of United States Infantry, then stationed in Texas. The company to which I was attached was quartered at Fort Duncan, a military post on the Rio Grande opposite the little town of Piedras Negras, on the boundary line between the United States and the Republic of Mexico. After the usual leaveake maps of the surrounding country, and, through constant association with our Mexican guide, to pick up in a short time quite a smattering of the Spanish language, which was very useful to one serving on that frontier. At that early day western Texas was literally filled with game, and the region in the immediate vicinity of La Pena contained its full proportion of deer, antelope, and wild turkeys. The temptation to hunt was therefore constantly before me, and a desire to indulge in thi
e Union people lest the State might be carried into the Confederacy. As a consequence great distrust existed in all quarters, and the loyal passengers on the steamer, not knowing what might occur during our voyage, prepared to meet emergencies by thoroughly organizing to frustrate any attempt that might possibly be made to carry us into some Southern port after we should leave Aspinwall. However, our fears proved groundless; at all events, no such attempt was made, and we reached New York in safety in November, 1861. A day or two in New York sufficed to replenish a most meagre wardrobe, and I then started West to join my new regiment, stopping a day and a night at the home of my parents in Ohio, where I had not been since I journeyed from Texas for the Pacific coast. The headquarters of my regiment were at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, to which point I proceeded with no further delay except a stay in the city of St. Louis long enough to pay my respects to General H. W. Halleck.
iminaries for your new field of duties. Your duty is to restore Texas, and that part of Louisiana held by the enemy, to the Union in the think the Rio Grande should be strongly held, whether the forces in Texas surrender or not, and that no time should be lost in getting troopsf the desire of the Government to make a strong showing of force in Texas, I decided to traverse the State with two columns of cavalry, direcay with two or three of these followers to join the Confederates in Texas, not having heard of Kirby Smith's surrender. A week or two later the rebellion, I asked for an increase of force to send troops into Texas--in fact, to concentrate at available points in the State an army st, an order prohibiting the embarkation from ports in Louisiana and Texas, for ports in Mexico, of any person without a permit from my headquans, and then, being called from my headquarters to the interior of Texas, a fortnight passed before I heard anything from Brownsville. In t
J. Hamilton appointed provisional Governor of Texas Assembles a Constitutional convention the Teers along the Rio Grande, the civil affairs of Texas and Louisiana required a certain amount of mil lack of system, Governor Pendleton Murray, of Texas, who was elected under Confederate rule, contise to much dissatisfaction among the people of Texas. They had assumed that affairs were to go on evious instructions regarding civil affairs in Texas so as to have them apply to all the seceded Stsent from the city at the time, returning from Texas, where I had been called by affairs on the Rioct. In the meantime official duty called me to Texas, and the mayor of the city, during my absence,t. In the mean time official duty called me to Texas, and the mayor of the city, during my absence,gia, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Florida, Texas, and Arkansas; and whereas, it is necessary tkansas, the fourth district; and Louisiana and Texas, the fifth district. Sec. 2. And be it fur
sons for such action affairs in Louisiana and Texas removal of Governor Wells revision of the juilitary District, which embraced Louisiana and Texas, a territory that had formed the main portion tion. Under these limitations Louisiana and Texas retained their former designations as militaryugh his friends and adherents in Louisiana and Texas, kept constantly advised of every step taken bhe law in Louisiana was likewise adhered to in Texas, and indeed was followed as a model in some of At this time the condition of the negroes in Texas and Louisiana was lamentable, though, in fact,st as if there had been no war. In the State of Texas there were in 1865 about 200,000 of the coction with the reconstruction of Louisiana and Texas practically closed with this order concerning of duty I had been performing in Louisiana and Texas was very trying under the most favorable circuwhole period that I commanded in Louisiana and Texas my position was a most unenviable one. The se
ired of their duplicity, and insisted of my ultimatum. The order for the execution brought quick fruit. Runners were sent out with messages, by the two prisoners, appealing to their people to save the lives of their chiefs, and the result was that the whole tribe came in to the post within the specified time. The two manacled wretches thus saved their necks; but it is to be regretted that the execution did not come off; for some years afterward their devilish propensities led them into Texas, where both engaged in the most horrible butcheries. The Kiowas were now in our hands, and all the Comanches too, except one small band, which, after the Custer fight, had fled toward the headwaters of the Red River. This party was made up of a lot of very bad Indians-outlaws from the main tribe-and we did not hope to subdue them except by a fight, and of this they got their fill; for Evans, moving from Monument Creek toward the western base of the Witchita Mountains on Christmas Day,