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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,030 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 578 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 482 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 198 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 116 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 96 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. You can also browse the collection for Texas (Texas, United States) or search for Texas (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

Chapter 1: United States Army California and Texas Confederate States Army Virginia, Yorktown, Eltham's Landing, seven Pines or Fair Oaks. I received at the age of seventeen an appo the troops in Virginia by authority of the Governor of that State. During my long service in Texas I had had occasion to visit almost ever portion of that extensive and beautiful territory, and wfor life. Therefore when Kentucky failed to act, I entered the Confederate service from the State of Texas, which thenceforth became my adopted land. I arrived in Richmond about the 5th of May, sentand peaceful scenes we had passed through together but a year or two before upon the frontier of Texas. His office was in the third or fourth story of, I think, the Mechanics' Institute; and he had rne by the Texans, and to them is due the largest share of the honors of the day at Eltham. The Texas brigade lost eight killed and twentyeight wounded; in the other portions of the command there we
mmanded in the Confederate Army. Major Whiting, who was captain of my company on the frontier of Texas, commanded the former in this bold attack to recapture these guns; his horse was killed under hiir right appeared to be open, and to afford an easy approach. I therefore dispatched some of my Texas scouts to reconnoitre in that direction. The report, shortly received, was of a favorable charahat early period of the war. Toward the close of the battle I pushed forward some of my reliable Texas scouts, and captured a number of new Federal ambulances, with a view to better the outfit of my batteries upon a hillock, in a meadow, near the edge of a corn field and just by the pike. The Texas brigade had been disposed on the left, and that of Law on the right. We opened fire, and a spirhe Eighteenth Georgia Regiment and Hampton's Legion, to both of which commands, I, as well as my Texas troops, had become warmly attached. The former had served with me longer than the latter, and i
an advanced force to tear down fences and clear the way. The instructions I received were to place my division across the Emmetsburg road, form line of battle, and attack. Before reaching this road, however, I had sent forward some of my picked Texas scouts to ascertain the position of the enemy's extreme left flank. They soon reported to me that it rested upon Round Top Mountain; that the country was open, and that I could march through an open woodland pasture around Round Top, and assaulted mountain, and, under this number of cross fires, put the enemy to flight. I knew that if the feat was accomplished, it must be at a most fearful sacrifice of as brave and gallant soldiers as ever engaged in battle. The reconnoissance of my Texas scouts and the development of the Federal lines were effected in a very short space of time; in truth, shorter than I have taken to recall and jot down these facts, although the scenes and events of that day are as clear to my mind as if the grea
and statements contained in my official report of the operations of the Army of the Tennessee. J. B. Hood, Lieutenant General. I received the following in reply: Danville, April 5th, 1865. Lieutenant General J. B. Hood. Proceed to Texas as heretofore ordered. S. Cooper, A. I. G. Danville, April 7th, 1865. Lieutenant General J. B. Hood. A Court of Inquiry cannot be convened in your case at present. You will proceed to Texas as heretofore ordered. S. Cooper, A. I. G. Texas as heretofore ordered. S. Cooper, A. I. G. Had I been granted a Court of Inquiry at that date, I would have produced stronger testimony than I have given, even at this late period, in relation to the points in controversy between General Johnston and myself. This attempt to summons me before a Court Martial was his final effort, during the war, to asperse the character of a brother officer who had always been true to duty, but whose unpardonable crime was having been appointed to supersede him in the command of the Army of Tenness
urgent in his instructions relative to the transferrence of troops to the Army of Tennessee from Texas, and I daily hoped to receive the glad tidings of their safe passage across the Mississippi riveward, unless for the special purpose of forming a junction with the expected reinforcements from Texas, and with the avowed intention to march back again upon Nashville. In truth, our Army was in thore determined to move upon Nashville, to entrench, to accept the chances of reinforcements from Texas, and, even at the risk of an attack in the meantime by overwhelming numbers, to adopt the only fseveral weeks in Richmond, during which interval I prepared my official report, I was ordered to Texas with instructions to gather together all the troops willing to follow me from that State, and moor General Davidson, of the United States Army. He courteously bade me retain it, paroled the officers and men in company with me, and allowed us to proceed without delay to Texas, via New Orleans.