hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,030 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 578 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 482 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 198 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 116 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 96 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Texas (Texas, United States) or search for Texas (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 9 document sections:

6.-the Texan expedition. A national account. flag-ship McLellan, off Brazos de Santiago, Texas, Nov. 2, 1863. Again an army of American soldiers is on Texas soil, and once more in the neighborhood of the almost sacred battle-fields of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma. The following account of the expedition from thewhich were heard on the flag-ship and answered by the waving of hats and handkerchiefs. She crossed the bar at precisely twelve o'clock noon, and from that moment Texas was ours. The General's despatch-boat — the little steamer Drew--followed, and she went capering along like a frisky young coquette of sixteen, bounding over the regiments on board, was the third to cross, and it was her good fortune to be the first to disembark her troops, the soldiers of the Fifteenth Maine first touching Texas soil. The next moment, the flag of this regiment, followed by that of the Nineteenth Iowa, was raised. Thus the men from the extreme northern point of the Union
agement. Buttea La Rose was captured, with a garrison and two heavy guns. By the gunboats, under Lieutenant Commanding T. Cooke, of the navy, General Banks reached Alexandria on the eighth of May, the enemy retreating toward Shreveport and into Texas. In this expedition General Banks reports the capture of two thousand prisoners, twenty-two pieces of artillery, two transports, and a large amount of public property. We destroyed three gunboats and eight transports. Our own loss, in the di No loss on our side reported. Small expeditions were also sent against Canton, Pontotoc, Grenada, and Natchez, Mississippi. At Grenada a large amount of rolling stock was destroyed. Near Natchez, General Ransom captured five thousand head of Texas cattle, a number of prisoners and teams, and a large amount of ammunition. The other expeditions were also successful, meeting with very little opposition. As soon as his army was supplied and rested, General Grant sent a force under General St
s District of Texas, New-Mexico, and Arizona, Houston, Nov. 27, 1863. To the planters of the coast counties: The Commanding General announces to the citizens of Texas, that a formidable invasion is attempted by the coast. Early in the month, General Banks took possession of the Lower Rio Grande, and on the eighteenth a force ocve their property, and especially their negroes, even by the base submission of men who should prefer death to dishonor. Should hopes be held out to the people of Texas that they will be exceptions to the rule so vigorously enforced in her sister States in localities where the enemy are in possession of temporary power, and shouldt of the country, the interest of the State, the interest of humanity, and the duty of the Commanding General to prevent. Therefore, he calls upon the citizens of Texas living in the counties bordering upon the navigable portions of the streams, and within fifty miles of the coast, to remove their able-bodied male slaves at once,
ses. The gallant troops so ably commanded in the States beyond the Mississippi, inflicted repeated defeats on the invading armies in Louisiana and on the coast of Texas. Detachments of troops and active bodies of partisans kept up so effective a war on the Mississippi River as practically to destroy its value as an avenue of commrogress has been checked. If we are forced to regret losses in Tennessee and Arkansas, we are not without ground for congratulations on successes in Louisiana and Texas. On the sea-coast he is exhausted by vain efforts to capture our ports; while, on the Northern frontier, he has in turn felt the pressure and dreads the renewal oon of internal taxation by the general government had influenced the legislation of the several States, and in only three of them--South-Carolina, Mississippi, and Texas--were the taxes actually collected from the people. The quota devolving upon the remaining States had been raised by the issue of bonds and State treasury notes,
ress to aid the rebellion; all who resigned commissions in the army or navy of the United States, and afterward aided the rebellion; and all who have engaged in any way in treating colored persons, or white persons in charge of such, otherwise than lawfully as prisoners of war, and which persons may have been found in the United States service as soldiers, seamen, or in any other capacity. And I do further proclaim, declare, and make known, that whenever, in any of the States of Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South-Carolina, and North-Carolina, a number of persons not less than one tenth in number of the votes cast in such State at the Presidential election of the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty, each having taken the oath aforesaid and not having since violated it, and being a qualified voter by the election law of the State existing immediately before the so-called act of secession, and excluding all others, sh
rom the pursuit, and the Twenty-ninth recrossed the river the same night. Sending out a reconnoissance the next morning, under Lieutenant-Colonel Schadt, of the Thirtieth Missouri, it was found that the enemy had never halted in his flight until ten miles from the field of battle, and that they were then in full and rapid retreat toward Trinity or Harrisonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one battalion Louisiana cavalry, Major Caldwell. The fight was plainly visible from the bluffs of Natchez — every movement of the enemy, every change of our men could be distinctly seen, and the male and female citizens of this loyal city, who had lined the banks to see their brave boys drive the Yankees and niggers into the river, had the satisfaction of seeing one thousand Southrons, with a reserve of five
point, had a fight, lost five men, and went to within five miles of Grenada; and ascertaining that Forrest was at that place in force, retraced his steps and joined the main command. Several days were spent in loading cotton, which was found along the river-shore, and after having secured one thousand six hundred bales, the expedition returned to Yazoo City on the twenty-eighth. Immediately upon arriving there, Major Cook went out with a small cavalry force, and encountered a brigade of Texas cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred, commanded by Brigadier-General L. S. Ross. A sharp fight ensued, in which Major Cook lost nineteen prisoners, and Colonel Jones, of the Texas cavalry,was killed. On the next morning, while out on a reconnoissance, a party of our troops found eight of the bodies of colored soldiers taken prisoners the day before. The clothing was stripped from their bodies, and all were shot through the head. Colonel Coates established his headquarters in th
Doc. 93.-blockade proclamation. By the President of the United States. Whereas, By my Proclamation of the nineteenth April, 1861, the ports of the States of South-Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, were, for reasons therein set forth, placed under blockade; and whereas the port of Brownsville, in the District of Brazos Santiago, in the State of Texas, has since been blockaded, but as the blockade of said port may now be safely released, with advanState of Texas, has since been blockaded, but as the blockade of said port may now be safely released, with advantage to the interests of commerce; now, therefore, be it known, that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, pursuant to the authority in me vested by the fifth section of the act of Congress, approved on the thirteenth of July, 1861, entitled, An Act further to provide for the collection of duties on imports, and for other purposes, do hereby declare that the blockade of the said port of Brownsville shall so far cease and determine, from and after this date, that commercial intercou
t for the able manner in which he suppresses rebel cavalry charges. Colonel Sweitzer, of the----Texas cavalry, undertook to break Colonel Shaw's lines by a charge. Orders were given to reserve yours a point in the extreme north-western part of Louisiana, near the boundary line of Arkansas and Texas. At the head of steamboat navigation on the Red River, in the midst of the largest and richest f the Thirty-third Missouri was wounded. The rebel General Scurry, commanding McCulloch's old Texas brigade, was slightly wounded; Major Muller, Seventeenth Texas rebel infantry, was killed. Lid arms, burning wagons, proved how well the previous day's work had been done by the soldiers of Texas and Louisiana. The gallant divisions from Missouri and Arkansas, unfortunately absent on the the happy home of heroes, where the kindred spirit of Alfred Mouton awaited it. Throughout broad Texas, throughout desolated Louisiana, mourning will sadden every hearth. Great is the loss to family