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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 416 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 114 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 80 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 46 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Vermont (Vermont, United States) or search for Vermont (Vermont, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXII. November, 1863 (search)
ever more be spectators of or participants in another war. And yet we know not how soon we might plunge into it, if an adequate necessity should arise. Henceforth, in all probability, we shall be a military people. But I shall seek the peaceful haunts of quiet seclusion, for which I sigh with great earnestness. O for a garden, a vine and fig-tree, and my library! Among the strange events of this war, not the least is the position on slavery (approving it) maintained by the Bishop of Vermont. November 5 The President has not yet returned, but was inspecting the defenses of Charleston. The Legislature has adjourned without fixing a maximum of prices. Every night troops from Lee's army are passing through the city. Probably they have been ordered to Bragg. Yesterday flour sold at auction at $100 per barrel; to-day it sells for $1201 There are 40,000 bushels of sweet potatoes, taken by the government as tithes, rotting at the depots between Richmond and Wilmington.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 44 (search)
uired. He came with Gen. B.'s passport, but felt in honor bound to communicate no intelligence, and voluntarily returned to captivity. We had Federal prisoners at work, but they were remanded to prison. Sunday, October 23 Bright and frosty. From the United States papers we learn that a great victory is claimed over Gen. Early, with the capture of forty-three guns! It is also stated that a party of Copperheads (Democrats), who had taken refuge in Canada, have made a raid into Vermont, and robbed some of the banks of their specie. The fact that Mr. McRae, who, with Mr. Henley (local forces), fell into the hands of the enemy a few miles below the city, was permitted to return within our own lines with a passport (without restrictions, etc.) from Gen. Butler, has not been mentioned by any of the newspapers, gives rise to many conjectures. Some say that somebody prohibited the publication; others, that the press has long been misrepresenting the conduct of the enemy;
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 46 (search)
lina and Georgia, and all repose implicit trust in Lee. A writer in the Sentinel suggests that if we should be hard pressed, the States ought to repeal the old Declaration of Independence, and voluntarily revert to their original proprietors-England, France, and Spain, and by them be protected from the North, etc. Ill-timed and injurious publication! A letter from G. N. Sanders, Montreal, Canada E., asks copies of orders (to be certified by Secretary of War) commanding the raid into Vermont, the burning, pillaging, etc., to save Lieut. Young's life. I doubt if such written orders are in existence-but no matter. It is said the enemy have captured Fort McAlister, Savannah Harbor. Mr. Hunter is very solicitous about the President's health-said to be an affection of the head; but the Vice-President has taken his seat in the Senate. It was rumored yesterday that the President would surely die,an idle rumor, perhaps. I hope it is not a disease of the brain, and incurabl