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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 416 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 114 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 80 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 46 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 38 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Vermont (Vermont, United States) or search for Vermont (Vermont, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Charles Francis Adams, who kept him minutely acquainted, from day to day, with the progress of events. One of the suggestions of Mr. Adams was, that there should be public demonstrations of loyalty throughout New England, and it was proposed by him to have salutes fired in each of the States on the 8th of January, the anniversary of General Jackson's victory at New Orleans. Colonel Wardrop, of New Bedford, Third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, was sent to Governor Fairbanks, of Vermont; and other messengers were sent to Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Maine, for this purpose. One of these messengers was the gentleman who afterwards became Governor Andrew's private military secretary,—Colonel Albert G. Browne, of Salem,—and who served him during the entire war; and who, for ability as a ready writer, truthfulness, sturdy independence, reticence, and undoubted patriotism, deserved, as he received, the respect and confidence of the Governor, the entire staff,
ies were detailed, with a portion of the Vermont and New-York regiments, to make up a detachment to join one from Hampton, to start at one o'clock the next morning to attack Big Bethel, a position held by the enemy about twelve miles from Newport News. Of the battle of Big Bethel it is needless to go into details. Its unfortunate result [says Adjutant Walker] was owing to a variety of causes; but if other troops had done their duty as well, and gone as far as those from Massachusetts and Vermont, the name of Big Bethel would not have headed a long list of federal repulses. Major Whittemore was the officer who reported to the commander of the fort. In a letter never published before, he says,— I was the first to step on shore, and the regiment was reported by myself to the Officer of the Day. I inquired of him who had possession of this fort,—the regulars or the rebels? He replied, United-States regulars. He was answered, Then the Fourth Regiment, Massachusetts Militia, ha
carriages at once. Governor to Governor Washburn, of Maine (telegram): New York urges that Maine would hurry forward her men. We have parted with certain equipments to Mr. Blaine, the agent of your adjutant. Governor to Governor Fairbanks, of Vermont (telegram): New York wants Vermont to hurry. The case is urgent. Your adjutant said that the three hundred muskets we let him have would finish equipment. April 27.—By direction of the Governor, Colonel Sargent, aide-de-camp, writes to SecrVermont to hurry. The case is urgent. Your adjutant said that the three hundred muskets we let him have would finish equipment. April 27.—By direction of the Governor, Colonel Sargent, aide-de-camp, writes to Secretary Cameron, asking to have the Irish Brigade, so called, sent to the forts to help man them and place the guns. Governor to General Wool, Cannot you send us an officer of the United States army, with authority to superintend the military operations, and to give us some advice, from time to time, on military questions? By direction of the Governor, Colonel Browne, private secretary, writes to the Mayor of Boston, in reply to a letter of the day before, Concerning the action of the city of B
he month of December, 1864, a battalion of cavalry was raised, intended for service on the frontier line of New York and Vermont, as a raid was expected from rebels gathered in the Canadas. The battalion was completed and mustered in on the 2d of Jmated the mind and action of our truly great Governor. On the 7th of March, Governor Andrew wrote to Governor Smith, of Vermont,— I have already proposed Good Friday to the Executive Council, who do not consent to it, but favor Thursday, the The statistics which are contained in this sketch refer, therefore, almost entirely to the work of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts; they being so blended in all the reports of the association, that it would be impossible to separateich contributions had been received during that year, and summing up as follows: In Maine, 155 towns; New Hampshire, 65; Vermont, 206; Massachusetts, 301; towns in other States, 8. Probably this represented fairly the proportions of other years, th