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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.20 (search)
frican Association for exploration, and, perhaps, something further. Their first essays were mostly on the eastern coast. On Stanley's return, at the end of 1877, he was met at Marseilles by messengers of King Leopold, to urge him to come to Brussels for a conference, and for the initiation of further African enterprise. He excused himself on the plea of physical exhaustion and unfitness for further undertakings. But he had other reasons, in his strong preference for England as his suppo and detail; the papers were transmitted to the King, and Stanley kept in touch with the project. But again he urged upon England that she should take the lead; and, again, in vain. Thereupon, he accepted an invitation to the Royal Palace at Brussels in November, and there met various persons of more or less note in the commercial and monetary world, from England, Germany, France, Belgium, and Holland. An organisation was made, under the name, Comite daEtude du Haut Congo (which afterward b
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
ith Sir William Mackinnon about East Africa, and explain about German aggressiveness in that region. Thence I moved to Paris; and, not many days later, I was in Brussels, where I was received with a tremendous demonstration of military and civilian honours. All the way to the royal palace, where I was to be lodged, the streets wthusiasm of the nation for the grand African domain secured to it by the munificence of their royal statesman and sovereign. Besides gold and silver medals from Brussels and Antwerp, the King graciously conferred on me the Grand Cross of the Order of Leopold, and the Grand Cross of the Congo. Every morning, however, between 10n us since we had first met in June, 1878, and discussed the possibilities of introducing civilisation on the Congo. The King began by saying that my visit to Brussels was sure to be followed by great results. He was very certain of being able to get the Congo Railway started now; for the Belgian people were thoroughly roused
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
istrator and organiser, 399, 400; effects on his health of the Emin Expedition, 401; in the last fourteen years of his life, 401, 402; his personal appearance, 402; Sir William Garstin's estimate of the importance of his discoveries, 404, 405; his master-passion, that of a civiliser, not of a discoverer, 405-407; had no pecuniary interest in Africa, 407, 408. On the charm of the Great Forest, 409; his return to civilisation, 409, 410; writes his book, In Darkest Africa, 411, 412; goes to Brussels and is received by the King of Belgium, 412; Grand Crosses conferred on him, 412; discusses African affairs with the King of Belgium, 413-417; arrives in England, 418; his reception in England, 419; his interview with Gladstone, 419-421; his refutation of the charge that he used slaves, 421, 422; In Darkest Africa published, 422; stirs up societies to see that Germany does not absorb too much of East Africa, 422; married, 423; meets Sir Richard F. Burton in the Engadine, 423; meets Camperio