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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
United States muskets and rifles of discarded pattern, the number supposed to be about seventy-five thousand; above forty thousand muskets belonging to the State of Virginia in course of rapid conversion from flint to percussion lock by Governor Letcher's orders; and twenty thousand lately procured for the State of Georgia, by Goer leading through Chambersburg, Williamsport (where it crosses the Potomac), and Martinsburg. These roads are met at Winchester by the principal one from Northwestern Virginia into the Valley, and also by a good and direct one from Manassas Junction, through Ashby's Gap, which, east of the Blue Ridge, had the advantage of easy coThe principal one at Washington, commanded by Major-General McDowell; the second at Chambersburg, under Major-General Patterson's command; and the third in Northwestern Virginia, under that of Major-General MoClellan. We supposed that these armies would cooperate with each other, and that the Federal general-in-chief would dire
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
ed to command Smith's division. When it was ascertained, about the 5th of April, that the Federal army was marching from Fort Monroe toward Yorktown, D. H. Hill's, D. R. Jones's, and Early's divisions, were transferred from the Army of Northern Virginia to that of the Peninsula. The former was thus reduced to four divisions: Jackson's at Mount Jackson, Ewell's on the Rappahannock, Longstreet's at Orange Court-House, and G. W. Smith's at Fredericksburg. Before the 10th, the President won, announced his decision in favor of General Lee's opinion, and directed that Smith's and Longstreet's divisions should join the Army of the Peninsula, and ordered me to go there and take command, the Departments of Norfolk and the Peninsula being added to that of Northern Virginia. The belief that events on the Peninsula would soon compel the Confederate Government to adopt my method of opposing the Federal army, reconciled me somewhat to the necessity of obeying the President's order.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
ase, that it was attended with little loss, considering the close proximity and repeated engagements of two such armies. Had ours been so strengthened in time to attack that of the United States when it reached the Chickahominy, and before being intrenched, results might and ought to have been decisive; still, that army, as led by its distinguished commander, compelled the Federal general to abandon his plan of operations, and reduced him to the defensive, and carried back the war to Northern Virginia. No action of the war has been so little understood as that of Seven Pines; the Southern people have felt no interest in it, because, being unfinished in consequence of the disabling of the commander, they saw no advantage derived from it; and the Federal commanders claimed the victory because the Confederate forces did not renew the battle on Sunday, and fell back to their camps on Monday. General Sumner stated to the committee on the conduct of the war, that he had, in the ba
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
iately turn over to General Hood. Orders transferring the command of the army to General Hood were written and published immediately, and next morning I replied to the Hon. Secretary's telegram: Your dispatch of yesterday received and obeyed. Command of the Army and Department of Tennessee has been transferred to General Hood. As to the alleged cause of my removal, I assert that Sherman's army is much stronger compared with that of Tennessee, than Grant's compared with that of Northern Virginia. Yet the enemy has been compelled to advance much more slowly to the vicinity of Atlanta, than to that of Richmond and Petersburg; and penetrated much deeper into Virginia than into Georgia. Confident language by a military commander is not usually regarded as evidence of competence. General Hood came to my quarters early in the morning of the 18th, and remained there during the day. Intelligence soon came from Major-Gen. Wheeler, that the Federal army was marching toward Atla
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
e these orders were received, if they were ever delivered to General Stoneman, the railroad bridges over the Catawba between Chesterville and Charlotte, and Charlotte and Lincolnton, and the railroad depot at Salisbury, were destroyed by these troops. Pettus's brigade, sent from Greensboroa to protect the railroad bridge over the Yadkin, arrived in time to repel the large party sent to burn it. The arrival of Brigadier-General Echols with Duke's and Vaughn's brigades of cavalry from Southwestern Virginia removed any apprehension of further damage of the kind. On the 21st, a dispatch was received from Major-General Cobb, announcing the occupation of Macon by Major-General Wilson's cavalry the day before the Federal commander declining to respect the information of an armistice given by his enemy. During the military operations preceding the armistice, there were ample supplies of provision and forage for our forces in the railroad-depots of North Carolina. We were forming sim
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
ridge. If imperative instructions to halt ever came to me from Richmond, it must have been when the army was established in its new position; so that they had no effect, and therefore made no impression on my memory. The representatives of Northern Virginia, in Congress, were greatly excited by the withdrawal of the army from Centreville, and saw the President on the subject. This may have drawn from him an order to me to halt — after the fact. 3. The allegations of this paragraph are complerevious year. of cavalry, probably not less than twelve thousand men, are not included in his estimate, it is not impossible that some infantry may have been omitted also. The Army of Tennessee was certainly numerically inferior to that of Northern Virginia, and General Bragg asserted See page 364. that Sherman's was superior in fighting force to Grant's. But if the disparity of force was greater in General Lee's case than in mine, I submit to the Southern people that to condemn me alone of a
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
rd to supplies lost at Yorktown, it is sufficient that I should call attention to the fact that, after the Army of Northern Virginia arrived at the vicinity of Yorktown, application was made to have stopped the supplies from Richmond, except upon mt it is not under my orders. If the President will direct the concentration of all the troops of North Carolina and Eastern Virginia, we may be able to hold Middle Virginia at least. If we permit ourselves to be driven beyond Richmond, we lose the Middle Virginia at least. If we permit ourselves to be driven beyond Richmond, we lose the means of maintaining this army. The enemy is now almost exactly between us and The army of the North. That army should, therefore, be drawn back to secure its communication with this one. A concentration of all our available forces may enabiderable number, from Mississippi to Tennessee. Those two departments are more distant from each other in time than Eastern Virginia and Middle Tennessee. In relation to detaching from General Bragg's army, permit me to remind you that I have be