Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Virginia (Virginia, United States) or search for Virginia (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
ounded I entered the service of my native State, Virginia. On the 25th of August, 1861, my company, Guy's battery, consisting of upwards of one hundred men and four pieces of artillery, were ordered to join General J. B. Floyd's command in Southwest Virginia as soon as practicable. We took the Central cars (now the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway), and were conveyed to its terminus at Jackson river by the next evening. Here we encamped that night. The next morning we commenced our line of march hed our destination on the 9th inst. In a short while, however, orders were received for General Floyd and his brigade to report to General Albert Sidney Johnston, whose command was then in the vicinity of Bowling Green, Ky. On the 26th day of December, my company of artillery left on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, en route for General Johnston's army. Thus ends a brief history of my experience in the campaign of 1861, in Southwestern Virginia, under General Jno. B. Floyd's command.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Editorial Paragraphs. General Fitzhugh Lee's Second tour in behalf of the Southern Historical Society. On the 19th of February last the Secretary left Richmond at 8 A. M., joined General Fitzhugh Lee at Charlottesville, and started on a tour from which we returned on the 19th of March. Travelling by the Chesapeake and Ohio, Virginia Midland, Norfolk and Western, and East Tennessee and Georgia railways, through the charming regions of Piedmont Virginia, the Valley of Virginia, Southwest Virginia, and East Tennessee, we reached Knoxville at 3:30 A. M., but even at that hour found Colonel Moses White and Professor W. G. McAdoo at the depot to give us a cordial welcome and comfortable quarters. The day was most pleasantly spent receiving calls from prominent citizens, driving around the city, inspecting the beautiful model farm of Mr. Dickerson, viewing the ground over which Longstreet's brave men made their fruitless charge, and visiting other points of interest in this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
1864, General Sigel commanded the Federal department of West Virginia. He had over 27,000 men present for duty under his command. These were scattered over his department, the two principal bodies being one of about 10,000 under Crook, in Southwest Virginia, and another of 8,500 under Sigel, in person, near Martinsburg. General Breckinridge commanded all the Confederate forces in this region. His forces amounted probably to over 8,000 men, scattered at different points. The Federal forces were ordered forward simultaneously with the advance of Grant on the Rapidan. Crook was to break the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, and destroy the lead mines and salt works in Southwest Virginia, while Sigel was to move up the Shenandoah Valley, and threaten Staunton and Charlottesville. Crook sent his cavalry under Averell against Wytheville and Saltville, while he led his infantry towards Dublin and New River bridge. Averell was defeated and driven back from Wytheville by Jno. Morgan; but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ed men and four pieces of artillery, were ordered to join General J. B. Floyd's command in Southwest Virginia as soon as practicable. We took the Central cars (now the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway), ahnston's army. Thus ends a brief history of my experience in the campaign of 1861, in Southwestern Virginia, under General Jno. B. Floyd's command. Confederate Artillery service. By Gen. E. P. orgia railways, through the charming regions of Piedmont Virginia, the Valley of Virginia, Southwest Virginia, and East Tennessee, we reached Knoxville at 3:30 A. M., but even at that hour founded over his department, the two principal bodies being one of about 10,000 under Crook, in Southwest Virginia, and another of 8,500 under Sigel, in person, near Martinsburg. General Breckinridge commto break the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, and destroy the lead mines and salt works in Southwest Virginia, while Sigel was to move up the Shenandoah Valley, and threaten Staunton and Charlottesvil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
part. Transferred from the State service to that of the Confederacy, with the rank of General, we behold him first in the field in the rugged mountains of Northwest Virginia, restoring the morale lost by the early reverses to our arms in that Department—holding invading columns in check with great disparity of force to meet themy with a fresh commander, Fighting Joe Hooker, renews the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absent in Southeast Virginia. But slender as are his numbers, Lee is ever aggressive; and while Hooker with the finest army on the planet, as he styled it, is confronting Lee near Chang tide breaking over the mountains—the sturdy Scotch-Irish for the most part, with some Germans and Englishmen, pouring into the Valley from Pennsylvania and Eastern Virginia, and from the fatherlands over the water. Not speculative adventurers were they, with the ambition of landlords, but bringing with them rifle and Bible, wif
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
to his fellow-citizens of the Southern States, and especially to those of his dear native State of Virginia. Accompanying this memoir was an official letter addressed to the President of the Uniteds his purpose to go to Washington, and that he should there await the action of his native State of Virginia, saying that his action would be governed solely by hers. If Virginia should stand by theeplied, General Scott, I will conclude what I came to say. I am awaiting the action of the State of Virginia. If Virginia stands by the old flag and the Union, I shall stand by them with my sword aned upon General Scott in his office at Washington a short time before the secession of the State of Virginia. I believe he was not able to fix the precise day; if he did, it has escaped me. When he ed States, and that he received from Colonel Lee the reply, that his first duty was to the State of Virginia. If Virginia remained by the Union, he should stand with her. If Virginia should secede,