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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 94 6 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 74 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 38 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 9 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington). You can also browse the collection for Paris (France) or search for Paris (France) in all documents.

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Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 3, Poem 3 (search)
m The Spartan queen: the house forsworn No more repels by Hector's arm My warriors, baffled and outworn: Hush'd is the war our strife made long: I welcome now, my hatred o'er, A grandson in the child of wrong, Him whom the Trojan priestess bore. Receive him, Mars! the gates of flame May open: let him taste forgiven The nectar, and enrol his name Among the peaceful ranks of Heaven. Let the wide waters sever still Ilium and Rome, the exiled race May reign and prosper where they will: So but in Paris' burial-place The cattle sport, the wild beasts hide Their cubs, the Capitol may stand All bright, and Rome in warlike pride O'er Media stretch a conqueror's hand. Aye, let her scatter far and wide Her terror, where tbe land-lock'd waves Europe from Afric's shore divide, Where swelling Nile the corn-field laves— Of strength more potent to disdain Hid gold, best buried in the mine, Than gather it with hand profane, That for man's greed would rob a shrine. Whate'er the bound to earth ordain'd,