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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 1 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
citations were much admired. On our annual holidays I was selected to lead the choir of gleesingers, and, after the Government Inspector's examinations, I was pronounced to be the most advanced pupil. I have no idea of my personal appearance at this time, but I remember to have heard some comments from bystanders as we bathed at Rhyl which made me blush violently, also Captain Thomas saying that it would be of vast benefit to me if I were put under a garden-roller. An old blacksmith of Denbigh, as I passed him one day, asked me if I was not the grandson of Moses Parry, and on my admitting it, pretended that I could not belong to the big-boned Parry breed; while one that stood by him terrified me by saying that I would be in prime order for eating, after a month's stuffing on raisins and sweeties. From an early age I contracted an intense dislike to these wretched personalities. In process of time my classmates, who had grown with me, and been promoted simultaneously with myse
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
comforted with friendly advice, we decided it would be best to push on towards Denbigh. Night overtook us, and we sought the lee of a haystack in a field, too tiredthat, you know? But what is the matter, children? How is it you have come to Denbigh? Have you been sent on errands, or have you run away? Don't be bashful, but oory waste, about half an hour from Holywell, and about five minutes walk from Denbigh. The district is mostly given up to lead-mining. I stopped in front of a newes scattered along a hillside, about three miles from St. Asaph, and four from Denbigh. In a remote time its humble founders had been constrained to build their cab farm-yard, cut and stacked fuel, drove Dobbin to Rhyl station for coal, or to Denbigh for beer, or to Mostyn for groceries — the odd jobs that may be done on a farmt of the rich Vale of Clwyd,--from the seashore at Rhyl to the castled town of Denbigh,--and between me and the sky nothing intervened. There was I happiest, withdr
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.14 (search)
esource and another, to support himself; we find him harvesting in Maryland, and, later, on an oyster-schooner, getting upon his feet, and out of the whirlpool of war into which he had naturally been drawn by mere propinquity, so to speak; now his heart turned with longing to his own kin, and the belated affection which he trusted he might find. November, 1862. I arrived, in the ship E. Sherman, at Liverpool. I was very poor, in bad health, and my clothes were shabby. I made my way to Denbigh, to my mother's house. With what pride I knocked at the door, buoyed up by a hope of being able to show what manliness I had acquired, not unwilling, perhaps, to magnify what I meant to become; though what I was, the excellence of my present position, was not so obvious to myself! Like a bride arraying herself in her best for her lover, I had arranged my story to please one who would, at last, I hoped, prove an affectionate mother! But I found no affection, and I never again sought for,
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
o sympathetic that the entire article, with only slight omissions, is here given a place. The map of Africa is a monument to Stanley, aere perennius. Monumentum aere perennius, says Horace, or, as we may put it, an Everlasting memorial. --D. S. There lie before me various atlases, published during the past sixty years, which is less than the span of Stanley's lifetime. I turn to a magnificently proportioned volume, bearing the date of 1849, when John Rowlands was a boy at school at Denbigh. In this atlas, the African Continent is exhibited, for about a third of its area, as a mighty blank. The coast is well-defined, and the northern part, as far as ten degrees from the Equator, is pretty freely sprinkled with familiar names. We have Lake Tchad, Bornu, Darfur, Wadi-el-Bagharmi, Sennaar, Kordofan, and Khartum, and so on. But at the southern line of the Soudan, or Nigritia, knowledge suddenly ceases; and we enter upon the void that extends, right through and across Africa, do
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
, 230. Cromer, 453. Cronin, Mr., 151-153. Cypress Grove, 151-166. Dalziell, Mr., 476. Darkest Africa, In, 411, 422. Davis, Richard Harding, 508. Death, thoughts on the fear of, 522, 523. Degrees conferred on Stanley, 424, 525. Denbigh, 219. Denbigh Castle, 4-8. Dido, the captain of the, 114. Dilke, Sir, Charles, 473, 474, 477. Dillon, John, 474, 476. Dixie Greys, the, 165, 166. Donnelly, Ignatius, Coesar's Column, 433. Douglas, Camp, 205-214. East African Coms meeting with his mother, 28, 29; the most advanced pupil, 30; his personal appearance, 30; acts as deputy over the school, 3; his struggle with Francis and flight from the Workhouse, 32-34; adventures after leaving the Workhouse, 35-37; visits Denbigh and learns of his relatives, 37-40; calls on his grandfather, John Rowlands, 40; engaged as pupil-teacher, 41; visits his aunt, Mary Owen, 42-47; at the National School at Brynford, 47-51; returns to Ffynnon Beuno, 51; life at Ffynnon Beuno, 51-