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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 56 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 50 0 Browse Search
The Venerable Bede, Historiam ecclesiasticam gentis Anglorum (ed. Charles Plummer) 24 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 18 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 6 0 Browse Search
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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 25 (search)
d by the Pyrenean forest, the Alps, mount Gebenna, and the two rivers, the Rhine and the Rhone, and being about three thousand two hundred miles in compass, into the form of a province, excepting only the nations in alliance with the republic, and such as had merited his favour; imposing upon this new acquisition an annual tribute of forty millions of sesterces. He was the first of the Romans who, crossing the Rhine by a bridge, attacked the Germanic tribes inhabiting the country beyond that river, whom he defeated in several engagements. He also invaded the Britons, a people formerly unknown, and having vanquished them, exacted from them contributions and hostages. Amidst such a series of successes, he experienced thrice only any signal disaster; once in Britain, when his fleet was nearly wrecked in a storm; in Gaul, at Gergovia, where one of his legions was put to the rout; and in the territory of the Germans, his lieutenants Titurius and Aurunculeius were cut off by an ambuscade.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 47 (search)
They likewise report that he invaded Britain in hopes of finding pearls, Bede, quoting Solinus, we believe, says that excellent pearls were found in the British seas, and that they were of all colors, but principally white. Eccl. Hist. b. i. c. i. the size of which he would compare together, and ascertain the weight by poising them in his hand; that he would purchase, at any cost, gems, carved works, statues, and pictures, executed by the eminent masters of antiquity; and that he would give for young and handy slaves a price so extravagant, that he forbad its being entered in the diary of his expenses.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 58 (search)
is difficult to say whether his caution or his daring was most conspicuous. He never marched his army by roads which were exposed to ambuscades, without having previously examined the nature of the ground by his scouts. Nor did he cross over to Britain, before he had carefully examined, in person, Caesar tells us himself that he employed C. Volusenus to reconnoitre the coast of Britain, sending him forward in a long ship, with orders to return and make his report before the expedition sailed. Britain, sending him forward in a long ship, with orders to return and make his report before the expedition sailed. the navigation, the harbours, and the most convenient point of landing in the island. When intelligence was brought to him of the siege of his camp in Germany, he made his way to his troops, through the enemy's stations, in a Gaulish dress. He crossed the sea from Brundisium and Dyrrachium, in the winter, through the midst of the enemy's fleets; and the troops, under orders to join him, being slow in their movements, notwithstand, ing repeated messages to hurry them, but to no purpose, he at l
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 19 (search)
make. Essedis: they were light cars, on two wheels, constructed to carry only one person; invented, it is supposed, by the Belgians, and by them introduced into Britain, where they were used in war. The Romans, after their expeditions in Gaul and Britain, adopted this useful vehicle instead of their more cumbrous RHEDA, not only Britain, adopted this useful vehicle instead of their more cumbrous RHEDA, not only for journies where dispatch was required, but in solemn processions, and for ordinary purposes. They seem to have become the fashion, for Ovid tells us that these little carriages were driven by young ladies, themselves holding the reins, Amor. xi. 16. 49. Most people, I know, are of opinion, that this bridge was designed by Caiuser the Hellespont, which is somewhat narrower than the distance betwixt Baiae and Puteoli. Others, however, thought that he did it to strike terror in Germany and Britain, which he was upon the point of invading, by the fame of some prodigious work. But for myself, when I was a boy, I heard my grandfather say, Suetonius flourished
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 21 (search)
Corinthian pillars, and seems to have been but a rude structure, suited to the purpose for which it was built, the amusement of the soldiers, and gymnastic exercises. For this purpose they were used to construct temporary amphitheatres near the stations in the distant provinces, which were not built of stone or brick, but hollow circular spots dug in the ground, round which the spectators sat on the declivity, on ranges of seats cut in the sod. Many vestiges of this kind have been traced in Britain. of which works, one was completed by his successor Claudius, and the other remained as he left it. The walls of Syracuse, which had fallen to decay by length of time, he repaired, as he likewise did the temples of the gods. He formed plans for rebuilding the palace of Polycrates at Samos, finishing the temple of the Didymaean Apollo at Miletus, and building a town on a ridge of the Alps; but, above all, for cutting through the isthmus in AchaiaThe Isthmus of Corinth; an enterprize which h
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 44 (search)
e time would have expired in a few days; alleging against them their age and infirmity; and railing at the covetous disposition of the rest of them, he reduced the bounty due to those who had served out their time to the sum of six thousand sesterces. Though he only received the submission of Adminius, the son of Cunobeline, a British king, who being driven from his native country by his father, came over to him with a small body of troops,Caligula appears to have meditated an expedition to Britain at the time of his pompous ovation at Puteoli, mentioned in c. xiii.; but if Julius Caesar could gain no permanent footing in this island, it was very improbable that a prince of Caligula's character would ever seriously attempt it, and we shall presently see that the whole affair turned out a farce. yet, as if the whole island had been surrendered to him, he dispatched magnificent letters to Rome. ordering the hearers to proceed in their carriages directly up to the forum and the senate-h
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 46 (search)
ea shells, and fill their helmets and the folds of their dress with them, calling them " the spoils of the ocean due to the Capitol and the Palatium." As a monument of his success, he raised a lofty tower, upon which, as at Pharos,It seems generally agreed that the point of the coast which was signalized by the ridiculous bravado of Caligula, somewhat redeemed by the erection of a lighthouse, was Itium, afterwards called Gessoriacum, and Bononia (Boulogne), a town belonging to the Gaulish tribe of the Morini; where Julius Casar embarked on his expedition, and which became the usual place of departure for the transit to Britain. he ordered lights to be burned in the night-time for the direction of ships at sea; and then promising the soldiers a donative of a hundred denariiThe denarius was worth at this time about seven pence or eight pence of English money. a man, as if he had surpassed the most eminent examples of generosity, "Go your ways," said he, "and be merry; go, ye are rich."
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 17 (search)
d him by the senate, he considered as beneath the imperial dignity, and was therefore resolved to have the honour of a real triumph. For this purpose, he selected Britain, which had never been attempted by any one since Julius Caesar, Opposed to this statement there is a passage in Servius Georgius, iii. 33, asserting that he had hes to Gessoriacum, Claudius must have expended more time in his march from Marseilles to Gessoriacum, as Boulogne was then called, than in his vaunted conquest of Britain. he thence passed over to Britain, and part of the island submitting to him, within a few days after his arrival, without battle or bloodshed, he returned to RomBritain, and part of the island submitting to him, within a few days after his arrival, without battle or bloodshed, he returned to Rome in less than six months from the time of his departure, and triumphed in the most solemn manner;In point of fact, he was only sixteen days in the island, receiving the submission of some tribes in the south-eastern districts. But the way had been prepared for him by his able general, Aulus Plautius, who defeated Cunobeline, and m
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 24 (search)
fice. He gave the triumphal ornaments to Silanus, who was betrothed to his daughter, though he was under age; and in other cases, he bestowed them on so many, and with so little reserve, that there is extant a letter unanimously addressed to him by all the legions, begging him "to grant his consular lieutenants the triumphal ornaments at the time of their appointment to commands, in order to prevent their seeking occasion to engage in unnecessary wars." He decreed to Aulus Plautius the honour of an ovation, To reward his able services as commander of the army in Britain. See before, c. xvii. going to meet him at his entering the city, and walking with him in the procession to the Capitol, and back, in which he took the left side, giving him the post of honour. He allowed Gabinius Secundus, upon his conquest of the Chauci, a German tribe, to assume the cognomen of Chaucius. German tribes between the Elbe and the Weser, whose chief seat was at Bremen, and others about Ems or Luneburg.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 25 (search)
observing the Parthian and Armenian ambassadors sitting among the senators, they took upon themselves to cross over into the same seats, as being, they said, no way inferior to the others, in point either of merit or rank. The religiouis rites of the Druids, solemnized with such horrid cruelties, which had only been forbidden the citizens of Rome during the reigh of Augustus, he utterly abolished among the Gauls.Pliny tells us that Druidism had its origin in Gaul, and was trnsplanted into Britain, xxi. 1. Julius Caesar asserts just the contrary, Bell. Gall. vi.13.11. The edict of Claudius was not carried into effect; at least, we find vestiges of Druidism in Gaul, during the reigns of Nero and Alexander Severus. On the other hand, he attempted to transfer the Eleusinian mysteries from Attica to Rome.The Eleusinian mysteries were never transferred from Athens to Rome, notwithstanding this attempt of Claudius, and although Aurelius Victor says that Adrian effected it. He likewise
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