hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 16 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). You can also browse the collection for Pytho (Greece) or search for Pytho (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 900 (search)
Pylades What then will become in the future of Loxias' oracles declared at Pytho, and of our sworn pact?Count all men your enemies rather than the gods. Orestes I judge you victor: you advise me well.To ClytaemestraCome, this way! I mean to kill you by his very side. For while he lived, you thought him better than my father.Sleep with him in death, since you love him but hate the man you were bound to love. Clytaemestra It was I who nourished you, and with you I would grow old. Orestes What! Murder my father and then make your home with me? Clytaemestra Fate, my child, must share the blame for this. Orestes And fate now brings this destiny to pass. Clytaemestra Have you no regard for a parent's curse, my son? Orestes You brought me to birth and yet you cast me out to misery. Clytaemestra No, surely I did not cast you out in sending you to the house of an ally. Orestes I was sold in disgrace, though I was born of a free father. Clytaemestra Then where is the price I got f
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 935 (search)
Chorus As to Priam and his sons justice came at last in crushing retribution,so to Agamemnon's house came a twofold lion, twofold slaughter.As a “twofold” lion (Clytaemestra and Aegisthus) has ravaged the house, so there has been a twofold slaughter by its defenders. There is no reference to Orestes and Pylades or to Agamemnon and Cassandra. The exile, the suppliant of Pytho, has fulfilled his course to the utmost, justly urged on by counsels from t
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 1021 (search)
w how it will end: I think I am a charioteer driving my team far beyond the course. For my ungoverned wits are whirling me away overmastered, and at my heart fear wishes to sing and dance to a tune of wrath.But while I am still in my senses, I proclaim to those who hold me dear and declare that not without justice did I slay my mother, the unclean murderess of my father, and a thing loathed by the gods. And for the spells that gave me the courage for this deed I count Loxias, the prophet of Pytho,my chief source. It was he who declared that, if I did this thing, I would be acquitted of wrongdoing. But if I refrained—I will not name the penalty; for no bowshot could reach such a height of anguish. And now observe me, how armed with this branch and wreath I go as a suppliant, an outcast for the shedding of kindred blood, to the temple set square on the womb of the earth,the precinct of Loxias, and to the bright fire said to be imperishable.In the Delphic shrine there was an undying f