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Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 16 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Pytho (Greece) or search for Pytho (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ard to Elare or Elara, the mother of Tityus, some people thought that she was a daughter of Minyas, not of Orchomenus (Scholiast on Hom. and Eustathius on Hom. Od. vii.324, p. 1581). Because Tityus was brought up under the earth, he was said to be earth-born (ghgenh/s, Scholiast on Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.761). Homer calls him simply a son of Earth (Hom. Od. 11.576), and in this he is followed by Verg. A. 6.595. When Latona came to Pytho, Tityus beheld her, and overpowered by lust drew her to him. But she called her children to her aid, and they shot him down with their arrows. And he is punished even after death; for vultures eat his heart in Hades.As to the crime and punishment of Tityus, see Hom. Od. 11.576-581; Pind. P. 4.90(160)ff., with the Scholiast on Pind. P. 4.90(160); Lucretius iii.984ff.; Verg. A. 6.595ff.; Hor. Carm. 2.14.8ff., iii.4.77ff., iii.11.21ff., iv.6.2ff.; Hyg
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ydes, quoted by the Scholiast on Eur. Alc. 1, it was not the Cyclopes but their sons whom Apollo slew. The passage of Pherecydes, as quoted by the Scholiast, runs as follows: “To him” (that is, to Admetus) “came Apollo, to serve him as a thrall for a year, at the command of Zeus, because Apollo had slain the sons of Brontes, of Steropes, and of Arges. He slew them out of spite at Zeus, because Zeus slew his son Aesculapius with a thunderbolt at Pytho; for by his remedies Aesculapius raised the dead.” But Zeus would have hurled him to Tartarus; however, at the intercession of Latona he ordered him to serve as a thrall to a man for a year. So he went to Admetus, son of Pheres, at Pherae, and served him as a herdsman, and caused all the cows to drop twins.See Frazer's Appendix to Apollodorus, “Apollo and the Kine of Admetus.” But some say that Aphareus and Leucippus were sons of Per