hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 16 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Pytho (Greece) or search for Pytho (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 19 document sections:

1 2
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 2 For Theron of Acragas Chariot Race 476 B. C. (search)
en. In such a way does Fate, who keeps their pleasant fortune to be handed from father to son, bring at another time some painful reversal together with god-sent prosperity, since the destined son met and killed Laius, and fulfilled the oracle of Pytho,spoken long before. But the sharp-eyed Erinys saw it, and destroyed his warlike sons through mutual slaughter. Yet Polyneices, when laid low, left behind him a son, Thersander, honored in youthful contests and in the battles of war,a scion to defend the house of the descendants of Adrastus. And it is fitting that the son of Aenesidamus, whose roots grew from that seed, should meet with songs of praise and with the lyre. For in Olympia he himself received a prize of honor; at Pythoand at the Isthmus, the Graces who love them both brought garlands of flowers to his equally blessed brother for his four-horse team, victorious in the twelve courses of the race. To attempt a contest and be successful brings release from sadness. Wealth adorn
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 6 For Hagesias of Syracuse Mule Car Race 472 or 468 B. C. (search)
ad his allotted home on the Alpheus,where Evadne was raised, and first touched the sweets of Aphrodite beneath Apollo's embrace. She did not escape the notice of Aepytus in all the time that she was hiding the offspring of the god; no, he went to Pytho, pressing down the unspeakable anger in his spirit with intense concern, to consult the oracle about this unbearable disaster. And she laid down her purple and saffron girdle,and her silver pitcher, and beneath a blue-shaded thicket gave birth topangs Iamus came right away into the light. In her distress,she left him on the ground. But by the will of the gods, two gray-eyed serpents nurtured him with the harmless venom of bees, caring for him. And when the king had driven back from rocky Pytho, he questioned everyone in the household about the child whom Evadne had borne. For he said that he was begotten by Phoebus, and that he would be, for men on earth, a prophet above all mortals, and that his race would never fail. Such was his spe
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 7 For Diagoras of Rhodes Boxing-Match 464 B. C. (search)
ne from a generous hand, and makes a gift of it to his young son-in-law, welcoming him with a toast from one home to another,honoring the grace of the symposium and the new Reading with Snell ne/os for e(o/n. marriage-bond, and thereby, in the presence of his friends, makes him enviable for his harmonious marriage-bed; I too, sending to victorious men poured nectar, the gift of the Muses, the sweet fruit of my mind, I try to win the gods' favorfor those men who were victors at Olympia and at Pytho. That man is prosperous, who is encompassed by good reports. Grace, which causes life to flourish, looks with favor now on one man, now on another, with both the sweet-singing lyre and the full-voiced notes of flutes. And now, with the music of flute and lyre alike I have come to land with Diagoras, singing the sea-child of Aphrodite and bride of Helios, Rhodes,so that I may praise this straight-fighting, tremendous man who had himself crowned beside the Alpheus and near Castalia, as a recom
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 9 For Epharmostus of Opus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. (search)
pus Wrestling-Match 466 B. C. The resounding strain of Archilochus, the swelling thrice-repeated song of triumph, sufficed to lead Epharmostus to the hill of Cronus, in victory-procession with his dear companions.But now, from the bow of the Muses who, shooting from afar, send a shower of such arrows of song as these on Zeus of the red lightning-bolt and on the sacred height of Elis, which once the Lydian hero Pelopswon as the very fine dowry of Hippodameia. And shoot a winged sweet arrow to Pytho; for your words will not fall to the ground, short of the mark, when you trill the lyre in honor of the wrestling of the man from renowned Opus. Praise Opus and her son;praise her whom Themis and her glorious daughter, the savior Eunomia, have received under their protection; she flourishes with excellence beside your stream, Castalia, and beside the Alpheus. From there the choicest garlandsglorify the famous mother-city of the Locrians with her splendid trees. I am lighting up that dear cit
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 12 For Ergoteles of Himera Long Foot Race 466 B. C (search)
ships are steered on the sea, and on dry land rushing battlesand assemblies where counsel is given. But men's expectations are often tossed up and then back down, as they cleave the waves of vain falsehood. Never yet has any man on earth found a reliable token of what will happen from the gods. Our understanding of the future is blind.And therefore many things fall out for men contrary to their judgement, bringing to some reversal of delight, while others, having encountered grievous storms, in a short time exchange their troubles for high success. Son of Philanor, truly, like a cock that fights at home, eventhe fame of your swift feet would have shed its leaves ingloriously beside your native hearth, if hostile civil strife had not deprived you of your Cnossian fatherland. But as things are, Ergoteles, having been crowned with garlands at Olympia, and twice from Pytho, and at the Isthmus, you exalt the hot baths of the Nymphs, while keeping company with them beside your own fields.
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 13 For Xenophon of Corinth Foot Race and Pentathlon 464 B. C. (search)
wind of Xenophon's good fortune. Receive the ordained song of praise in honor of his garlands, the procession which he leads from the plains of Pisa,since he has been victorious in both the pentathlon and the foot race; he has attained what no mortal man has ever attained before. Two wreaths of wild celery crowned him, when he appeared at the Isthmian festival; and Nemea does not speak differently.The brilliance of his father Thessalus' feet is stored up by the streams of the Alpheus, and at Pytho he has honor for the single and the double foot race within the circuit of a single day's sun; and in the same month, in rocky Athens, one swift-footed day placed three very beautiful prizes on his head, and the games of Athena Hellotis give him seven victories. In the games of Poseidon between the two seas, the songs would be too long that could tell of all the victories won by Terpsias and Eritimus, with their father Ptoeodorus. And as for all the times you were best at Delphi, and in the
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 3 For Hieron of Syracuse Horse Race ?474 B. C. (search)
n evening songs to their companion.Reading with Snell e(tai/ra| for e(tai=rai. Instead,she was in love with what was distant; many others have felt that passion. There is a worthless tribe among men which dishonors what is at home and looks far away, hunting down empty air with hopes that cannot be fulfilled. Such was the strong infatuationthat the spirit of lovely-robed Coronis had caught. For she lay in the bed of a stranger who came from Arcadia; but she did not elude the watcher. Even in Pytho where sheep are sacrificed, the king of the temple happened to perceive it, Loxias, persuading his thoughts with his unerring counsellor: his mind, which knows all things. He does not grasp falsehood, and he is deceivedby neither god nor man, neither in deeds nor in thoughts. Knowing even then of her sleeping with Ischys, son of Elatus, and of her lawless deceit, he sent his sister, raging with irresistible force, to Lacereia, since the girl lived by the banks of Lake Boebias.A contrary fort
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 4 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. Today you must stand beside a beloved man, Muse, the king of Cyrene with its fine horses, so that while Arcesilas celebrates his triumph you may swell the fair wind of song that is due to the children of Leto and to Pytho, where once the priestess seated beside the golden eagles of Zeus,on a day when Apollo happened to be present, gave an oracle naming Battus as the colonizer of fruitful Libya, and telling how he would at once leave the holy island and found a cithen you came to ask the oracle what relief the gods would grant you for your stammering voice. And even now, in later days, as in the prime of red-blossoming spring,eighth in the line of Battus' descendants flourishes Arcesilas. To him Apollo and Pytho gave glory in the chariot race above those that live around. I will offer him, and the all-golden fleece of the ram, to the Muses as a theme for song. For when the Minyans sailed after that fleece, divinely-sent honors were planted for his race.
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 5 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
eafter a hero worshipped by the people. Apart from him, in front of the houses, are the other sacred kings who took their allotted places in Hades, and somehow below the earth they hear, in their minds, great excellence sprinkled with gentle dewby the outpourings of victory-songs—prosperity for themselves, and a justly earned and shared grace for their son Arcesilas. It is fitting for him, in the song of the young men, to celebrate Phoebus with his golden sword, now that he has received from Pytho the graceful victory-song as a compensation for his expense. Intelligent men praise him. I will say what has been said by others:he nurtures a mind and tongue that are beyond his years; in courage he is a long-winged eagle among birds; his strength in competition is like a bulwark. Among the Muses, he has had wings since he was a child in his dear mother's lap,and he has proved himself a skillful charioteer. He has boldly tried every local opportunity for fine deeds, and now a god gladly bri
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. (search)
Pythian 7 For Megacles of Athens Four-Horse Chariot Race 486 B. C. The great city of Athens is the most beautiful prelude of song, which the widely powerful race of the Alcmaeonids can lay as a foundation of odes in honor of their horses.What fatherland, what family will you name that is more illustrious in Greece? For in all cities the storyof the citizens of Erechtheus makes the rounds, Apollo, how they made your dwelling in divine Pytho a marvel to see. Five Isthmian victories lead my song forward, and one outstanding triumphat Zeus' Olympian games, and two from Cirrha— yours, Megacles, and your ancestors'. I rejoice at this new success; but I grieve that fine deeds are repaid with envy.It is true what they say: the abiding bloom of good fortune brings with it both good and bad.
1 2