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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Funchal (Portugal) or search for Funchal (Portugal) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
. C., February 3, 1895.] the terror of the Arctic seas captured Thirty-eight whalers, and destroyed Shipping valued at nearly $7,000,000. A graphic account of the Cruise of the great commerce Destroyer, from the time of her fitting out near Funchal, Madeira, October, 1864, to her surrender to the British at Liverpool, November, 1865. By Lieutenant John Grimball, C. S. Navy. With a summary afforded by the naval records office at Washington. On the 6th October, 1864, the Confederate strs and munitions of war, she having arrived two days before from Liverpool. The Laurel was a blockade runner, commanded by Captain Ramsey, a young Englishman of energy and resources. Capt. Ramsey's brilliant Ruse. When the authorities at Funchal objected to our presence in the harbor, and seriously and persistently insisted that the Laurel should proceed at once to sea, Ramsey was ready with a broken piece of machinery, without which he insisted that his engines could not be made to mov